How do you take your Blog Ketchup?



When I scan thru the headlines on my RSS aggregator, I’m quickly trying to determine if the post is worth exploring further. I do that with everyone of the some 150+ feeds I subscribe to, except for one.

When ever Kim Krause-Berg posts to her blog, I instinctively click straight thru to the site. I know that when I get there, I’ll be better for reading what ever she has to say.

Today’s offering is no different. While many are trying to define blogging, Kim comes up with the perfect analogy. Blogs are like an order of french fries with ketchup. Different people have different ways of taking their order, but its all still fries with ketchup.

With blogs and fries, you get used to the same delivered order. You get familiar with the blog cook. You come to expect the plain fries blog, where you scroll down and grab the news in bits and pieces, hoping it’s not a re-run you just read at another blog. Sometimes you get a catsup splattered blog, which has embedded links, pictures, quotes, categories, tag clouds, and comments. You get your fingers wet because there’s lots of places to stick them.

So where does MP fit in the analogy? I like to think that we’re the ketchup that stays put in the bottle. You know there is something good inside somewhere, you just hope that you can get to it before you run out of fries. ;-)

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/37112 Kim Krause Berg

    Ya know Andy? The hardest thing about writing that post was figuring out which way to spell “catsup”/”ketchup”.

    And then wondering if any of the rest of the post made any sense.

    Fries…blogs…I mean really.
    Glad (ok very thrilled) you liked it :)

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/1685318 Andy Beal

    I had never heard of “catsup” so I learned at least one thing from the post. ;-)

  • http://blogometer.com/ Alan Gutierrez

    I’ve been desrcribing blogs to those who are not in the know as an “open letter.”

    I’m living in a new city, New Orleans, and building a hyper-local blogging business.

    New Orleans does not use the web as avidly as other cities. People ask for web sites. They want an extension to their business card, preferably with Flash.

    I demonstrate blogging, explain the importance of search, etc.

    However, the problem with a content driven site, is that people have to create the content.

    The open letter analogy quells the fear that someone is going to have to fill a site like it’s the New York Times.

    Simply pick a subject and write a a little bit about it.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/1685318 Andy Beal

    Great idea Alan!