Google Helping YouTube Avoid Litigation

Business 2.0 explains why the expected influx of law suits against YouTube, with its acquisition by Google, never materialized. Instead, Google helped bring credibility to the video sharing site and discovered ways to work with the big TV networks.

For example, take a look at the deal struck with CBS.

As part of the deal, CBS agreed to offer free video clips for downloading. In return, the media company gets to sniff around YouTube for any content bearing its copyright. CBS can then choose between removing the offending clips or getting a cut of the revenue YouTube generates from any advertising linked to the clip.

That’s brilliant! YouTube gets sanctioned clips from CBS and in return CBS gets to decide if a video clip should be pulled or if it will help them generate buzz and/or money.

Search Engine Land Leaves Pre-Alpha

After much teasing, Search Engine Land finally delivers the goods and launches with a new look.

Danny Sullivan takes the time to explain the reason behind the name – if I had know he was having that much trouble finding a good domain name, I would have given him SearchEnginePulse.com – and also gives us a tour of the new site.

Apparently they’re working on a new comment system, which is good ‘cos there’s no way I am commenting if I have to go thru that Typekey registration process. We’ll also see if they’re accepting trackbacks/pingbacks with this post.

Google Copies Yahoo, Yahoo Copies Google

More fun than watching readers complain that my article on Google’s click-fraud was straight from their PR department, is watching Yahoo accuse Google of copying, then watching Google making the same accusation.

First, Yahoo’s Jeremy Zawodny points out how Google copied Yahoo’s promo page for Internet Explorer 7.

Then, Google’s Matt Cutts suggests those in photoshop-houses shouldn’t throw stones.

Meanwhile, I’ve not seen anyone suggesting IE 7 is simply copying Firefox. ;-)

Exclusive: Google’s Click Fraud Rate is Less than 2%


Digg!

UPDATE: Ghosemajumder has clarified that my assumptions of less than 2% should be based on “invalid clicks”, which means the actual number is more likely just a fraction of one percent!

New York Times Joins List of Digg Spammers

If we’re to believe the tripe fed to us by CNET recently, we’d have to add the New York Times to the list of “spammers” and “scammers” out to game Digg. Why?

TechCrunch reports that the NYT has added social bookmark links to many of its stories, including links to Digg, Facebook and Newsvine.

This seems like a begrudging move for The Times, a paper with an elitist reputation and a crossword puzzle that you need a PhD to solve. A social networking site like Facebook doesn’t seem the type of company that The Times would consort with but getting into social news sharing is just good business these days.

Does this mean that social bookmarking has jumped the shark? How can it be trendy and cutting edge, if even the NYT is in on the act?

Firefox TV Ads Go Live

It looks like Firefox plans to capitalize in its recent surge in popularity by airing fan-based television commercials, according to Read/WriteWeb.

The ads will initially appear only to viewers in the San Francisco and Boston area, but will likely expand to other areas over time. Each ad will focus on the theme that Firefox is “the safest, fastest and most enjoyable way to experience the Web,” and will be sponsored by users and fans of the browser – (each contributing upwards of $10 of their own cash to help pay for the ads).

So, who does Firefox hope to target with the TV ads?

…they’re going after prime time cable channels like Comedy Central, ESPN, TNT, History Channel, USA, and MTV. In terms of demographics, they’re targeting people who they think are willing to download and try Firefox.

Does Coke’s Deal With YouTube Suggest the End of Google Video?

ClickZ reports that Coca-Cola has signed a deal with YouTube to allow users to create custom video messages for the holidays.

What I find interesting is that this is a deal with YouTube. The significance? It was only a few weeks back that Coke did an ad deal with Google Video, so why not simply continue with that arrangement?

It’s clear that YouTube will replace Google Video and we may even see Google winding-down Google Video in the coming months, as they push YouTube’s more hip brand.