Marketing Pilgrim's "Local" Channel

Sponsor Marketing Pilgrim's Local Channel today! Get in front of some of the most influential readers in the Internet and social media marketing industry. Contact us today!

You’re the Expert: Explain the Nokia/Google Partnership and Get a Free Link




I’m going to try something different. Today, you have the chance to be the expert and provide your thoughts on a news story.

I’m starting with Nokia’s announcement that Google search will be integrated with the Nokia Search application.

The story is all over the news. Maybe it’s just a slow news day, or maybe there’s more than meets the eye. Instead of me trying to explain it, I want you to.

What does this say about Google’s Android project?

What does this say about Nokia’s faith in its own technology?

Is this another nail in the coffin of rivals Yahoo and Microsoft?

Leave your theory, thoughts, and analysis in the comments section below. I’ll select the best one and add it to the bottom of this post–complete with a link to your web site.

So, have at it! Show me what you’ve got!

UPDATE: Just two opinions shared, so we’ll include them both! Thanks!

Corey Hammond Says:

Nokia is the worldwide leader as a cell phone manufacturer. By partnering with Nokia, Google extends its search feature worldwide. Nokia is also a good fit because they like open source. First, they utilize GSM technology in a lot of their phones which can be unlocked and transfered between carriers very easily(I believe most European cell phones are unlocked). As well, they offer a lot of phone with Symbian which is an open source OS. This is exactly what Google’s Android is as well, an open source OS. I’m not saying that Android would replace Symbian, but it could start showing up in Nokia handsets a lot easier than in other manufacturers. There were 77.3 million Symbian phones sold this past year which beat out Microsoft’s WinMo and Applie’s iPhone. Sounds like a good partnership for both parties.

Giun Sun Says:

There’s definitely more than meets the eye in this deal. Nokia’s search application already has Yahoo and Windows Live…and now with Google in the mix of things, it truly will be another “nail in the coffin” for Google’s rivals. News articles are saying this may be a defensive move for Nokia because of Google’s Android devices coming in the later half of 08. However, Nokia is quite confident in it’s platform, Symbian, and puts faith in it by adding Google to it’s search feature. A good arguement from Symbian would be that Google lacks experience in this field. It’s quite a challenge to develop a mobile OS indeed.

What does this mean for Android? Well, just because Google has dominated online searching and adversting, it doesn’t mean they can work the same magic in the mobile field…it’s quite a different beast in itself and definitely won’t be a walk in the park stuffing all those web tools into a tiny device. So this move could show that Google is losing some confidence in their platform in supporting Nokia…because it couldn’t possibly be a move from Google to use it as a doorstep into Nokia. With the buying of Trolltech ASA(a key player in linux handsets), consider the remote thought of Nokia using Google’s Android software destroyed. Since Trolltech has quietly joined the LiMO foundation (and thus Nokia joining through the back door), LiMO (body to promote a standard Linux) will not just be the weaker of the two now(the other being OHA, the independent group created in supporting Android), but a much stronger threat.

  • http://www.coreyhammond.com Corey Hammond

    Nokia is the worldwide leader as a cell phone manufacturer. By partnering with Nokia, Google extends its search feature worldwide. Nokia is also a good fit because they like open source. First, they utilize GSM technology in a lot of their phones which can be unlocked and transfered between carriers very easily(I believe most European cell phones are unlocked). As well, they offer a lot of phone with Symbian which is an open source OS. This is exactly what Google’s Android is as well, an open source OS. I’m not saying that Android would replace Symbian, but it could start showing up in Nokia handsets a lot easier than in other manufacturers. There were 77.3 million Symbian phones sold this past year which beat out Microsoft’s WinMo and Applie’s iPhone. Sounds like a good partnership for both parties.

  • http://madhatter.goofyasians.com Giun Sun

    There’s definitely more than meets the eye in this deal. Nokia’s search application already has Yahoo and Windows Live…and now with Google in the mix of things, it truly will be another “nail in the coffin” for Google’s rivals. News articles are saying this may be a defensive move for Nokia because of Google’s Android devices coming in the later half of 08. However, Nokia is quite confident in it’s platform, Symbian, and puts faith in it by adding Google to it’s search feature. A good arguement from Symbian would be that Google lacks experience in this field. It’s quite a challenge to develop a mobile OS indeed. What does this mean for Android? Well, just because Google has dominated online searching and adversting, it doesn’t mean they can work the same magic in the mobile field…it’s quite a different beast in itself and definitely won’t be a walk in the park stuffing all those web tools into a tiny device. So this move could show that Google is losing some confidence in their platform in supporting Nokia…because it couldn’t possibly be a move from Google to use it as a doorstep into Nokia. With the buying of Trolltech ASA(a key player in linux handsets), consider the remote thought of Nokia using Google’s Android software destroyed. Since Trolltech has quietly joined the LiMO foundation (and thus Nokia joining through the back door), LiMO (body to promote a standard Linux) will not just be the weaker of the two now(the other being OHA, the independent group created in supporting Android), but a much stronger threat.

  • http://www.marketingpilgrim.com Andy Beal

    Thanks Corey and Giun – I added you both! :-)

  • http://www.workconnexions.com/blog/Leo.aspx Leo

    Who benefits the most from this deal… It would appear that both parties feel they have something to win. Being giants in there respected fields this partnership will only cement there long standing positions. Looking at it from another perspective. Would Nokia want to deal with anyone else? why go for the small fry when you can have the whole chicken. How about Google? It the same again. This is why this match is so good as it works both ways.

  • http://shonzilla.tumblr.com Shonzilla

    This move does not say anything yet about what Nokia thinks nor expects from Google Android platform. Currently, Android is in kindergarten with many hopes of it becoming a wunderkind everyone will want to play with. Nokia will continue with its offering that will be only more attractive after the acquisition of Trolltech and its platform-independent SDK (Qt for desktop, Qtopia for mobiles). Trolltech technology has more appeal to C++ developers but has Java bindings as well and will probably be merged into Symbian SDK (C++, Java and Python flavors). Symbian and Android will surely be competitors on the platform and SDK levels.

    Until February 12th, Google and Nokia did not overlap in the search market. Google is the search market superstar and, more importantly, has dedicated a lot of brainpower to mobile search for at least past 2 years. With this in mind, it’s clear that Nokia is not kicking around the bush but it’s rather beefing up its own offering, filling the layers between the hardware and user with the best-of-breed solutions. Nokia has a clue and they’re not reinventing the Search Wheel, just as Apple did for iPhone. Microsoft-Yahoo confusion only makes Nokia’s decision more meaningful.

    From Google’s perspective, the Nokia deal is yet another foot in the mobile search door, while Yahoo! and Microsoft are lagging behind anyway. For me, not even some Microshoo! zombie would help them as they’ll remain a minority in the (mobile) search.

    Cheers!
    Shonzilla

  • http://none jungwhan

    What does this say about Google’s Android project?

    Nokia makes money by selling phones, Google makes money by advertising. Their business model and technology are not in conflict with each other, as it may seem with Android and Symbian both being mobile OS. Google and Nokia are both the dominant players in Internet and mobile phones market. Android is just another card for Google as is Symbian for Nokia, and both can make still make money without either of them. Android may still be important for bringing Gmail, notes, calendar, office and etc which I believe will be a winner as Google has significant advantage over other platforms like Symbian that lacks basis for allowing users to transparently and seamlessly use Internet.

    What does this say about Nokia’s faith in its own technology?

    I think the start of mobile internet race set a starting point with this year’s WMC, with giants like Microsoft announcing its bid for Yahoo, Google’s android and partnerships. There are many uncertanties in this market and therefore lots of risks and opportunities for companies like Nokia and other competitors to turn the table around. I think Nokia just doesn’t want to put all of its eggs in one basket for now, after all they are a manufacturer and wouldn’t want to risk by solely relying on Symbian, and it can still win no matter which platform becomes dominant. After all, Nokia announced they will be shipping phones with Windows Mobile.
    Although Nokia buying Navteq clearly indicates that they want a strong foothold in the “contents” domain and not just hardware, but they cannot do this without a partnership with a strong internet company. And I don’t think any of this this has much to do with Nokia’s faith in its own technology, unless you are talking about Symbian. And I believe Nokia will be willing to compromise a little on Symbian if that’s what it takes to be the leader in future mobile market.

    Is this another nail in the coffin of rivals Yahoo and Microsoft?

    I wouldn’t want to put it as strongly as that, but the boundaries of mobile phones and personal computers is slowly disappearing and so far the players of this “future” market have been lingering without a clear winner, and it seems Nokia and Google had a better start than these two, but I beileve it is going to be a long race (at least not as short as a week in Barcelona) with so many variables. I just believe all this is good for consumers with all the advances and competition to bring better prices at lower cost.

  • http://www.marketingpilgrim.com Andy Beal

    Thanks guys!

  • Pingback: WorkConnexions » Should Google acquire a social net working site?

  • Pingback: Should Google Acquire A Social Networking Site? | Whooah.biz