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Men More Likely to be on LinkedIn, Flickr




Last month I posted about patterns between men and women and their patterns of making friends on social networking sites. Rapleaf has another study that gives more insights into which sites are popular between the sexes and across age groups.

People on social media sites are usually in the age range of 14 to 24 years old. Rapleaf’s study focused on 49.3 million people in their database who are aged 14-74. They found a total of 120 million profiles on social networking sites and most people average having profiles on 2-3 different sites.

Here are some findings:

  • Women are more likely to be on Myspace and Facebook. Especially the younger crowd, age 14-24 (the 14-24 year old demographic represents 65.5% and 66.25% of total users respectively).
  • Men are more likely to be on LinkedIn and Flickr, especially men aged 25-34 years old (the 25-34 year old demographic represents 51.0% and 38.1% of total users respectively).

Myspace users peak at 17-18 years old and then greatly drop off where Facebook takes over. They “theorize that once Myspace users graduate from high school, they switch over to using Facebook.” Overall MySpace has the most people.

The press release has a lot of data about who’s on social networks and it should be interesting for marketers. I was surprised to see that MySpace has the most people over 65. Here’s one of the charts that shows the breakdown of people by age group.

Social Network Age Groups Number of Total Members
14-17 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+
Bebo 30.88% 37.75% 21.16% 6.22% 2.54% 1.05% 0.41% 5,806,867
BlackPlanet 14.97% 47.28% 25.74% 8.50% 2.55% 0.66% 0.30% 1,201,687
Classmates 6.82% 29.10% 38.32% 14.98% 7.24% 2.78% 0.76% 3,051,761
Facebook 19.77% 46.38% 24.07% 6.34% 2.35% 0.76% 0.32% 5,920,236
Flickr 6.63% 27.21% 38.06% 17.20% 7.50% 2.70% 0.71% 2,068,097
Flixster 21.57% 38.41% 24.99% 9.29% 3.98% 1.36% 0.40% 17,647,399
Friendster 10.89% 41.13% 34.49% 9.40% 2.80% 0.89% 0.39% 5,260,380
Hi5 16.90% 44.44% 26.27% 7.96% 3.15% 0.99% 0.29% 14,679,615
LinkedIn 1.06% 10.72% 50.98% 24.66% 8.91% 3.07% 0.61% 841,209
Multiply 12.58% 45.39% 28.80% 8.45% 3.31% 1.08% 0.39% 1,354,647
Myspace 26.78% 38.69% 22.11% 7.73% 3.20% 1.05% 0.43% 31,845,954
MyYearbook 38.30% 36.39% 15.39% 6.21% 2.57% 0.78% 0.36% 2,449,251
Perfspot 13.07% 41.06% 30.37% 10.19% 3.81% 1.17% 0.33% 1,159,539
Ringo 17.66% 42.33% 26.53% 8.67% 3.43% 1.06% 0.32% 9,770,151
Tickle 17.33% 40.25% 26.65% 9.58% 4.38% 1.40% 0.40% 6,481,601

  • http://www.bocanetworks.com Michele

    This is really interesting but we alredy kinda knew that MySpace and Facebook are for the younger crowd as Linked IN and Flickr are more for business connections.

    But a VERY good article.

    Michele Alonso
    http://www.bocanetworks.com

  • http://menshealth-shane-wade.blogspot.com Shane

    Wow! I had no idea that many people over 65 are hanging out at myspace.lol… This age group is hanging out at Classmates and LinkIn too.Not bad. There’s mingling for everyone on the net.If you are looking to network with the business crowd, LinkIn would be the place to be. If I want to have fun, I usually head on over to Facebook or Myspace. Social Networks is the future that’s for sure.

    Shane’s last blog post..Dangerous Penis Methods

  • http://mp3leben.com Tiffany

    Interesting result. I would really love to read how do they analyze this result, especially why the seniors like Myspace.

  • Fred

    What is the point of this article when all of the contents come from elsewhere?

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  • http://www.brandeedanielle.com John Rhodes

    Good article, I’m going to check them out.

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