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Google & Bank Work Together, But Still Can’t Reactivate Gmail Account

So it was all for nothing.

After having a panic attack and asking a judge to shut down a Gmail user’s account, Rocky Mountain Bank and Google have worked together on a resolution. The only problem is, Google can’t reinstate the Gmail account without the judge’s permission!

“While we regret that the user has been locked out of their account through no fault of their own, we’re not legally able to reactivate the account until the court approves our motion to dismiss the case and vacate the TRO,” Pederson added. “We’re hopeful that the court will act quickly, and as soon as the motion is approved, we’ll reactivate the account.”

OK, a couple of questions.

First, how is it that Google and Rocky Mountain Bank couldn’t cooperate in the first place? The judge didn’t order the two sides to work together, but according to Google spokesman Andrew Pederson both sides “resolved the issue around the bank’s error.” See, was that so hard?

Second, who’s wrath is Google worried about that it won’t reactivate the Gmail user’s account? It just went behind the judges back and “resolved” the issue with the bank. Turn the damn account back on!

Lastly–yes, I’m redefining “a couple of questions” to mean “three” here–what will Google do going forward? This “we ain’t doing anything unless a court orders us to” policy is getting extremely dangerous. What if the next judge decides Google needs to destroy every email in a Gmail user’s inbox? What if a court orders Google to delete all of the documents found in Google Docs?

I’m hoping–but not holding my breath–that Google will learn that it desperately needs to beef up its user protection policies. Judges aren’t that smart when it comes to the internet–sorry judges, I’m sure some of you are–and simply relying on them to decide the fate of our internet accounts is like letting our government decide the type of medical treatment we receive….oh, nevermind. ;-)