Parlez-vous Chrome? Sí, sí, ¿cómo no?



If you were using Chrome, you’d already know what that headline means. (Okay, probably not.) Chrome is integrating a translation tool in its latest beta version. If you browse across a site that’s not in your default language, it’ll offer to translate it for you. Which may or may not help you understand it ;) . (Since this page is in English, it probably won’t help you with the title. Sorry.) Other improvements in this edition of Chrome include better access to your privacy settings.

The translation tool will use Google Translate. While machine translation is growing by leaps and bounds, however, it may not be enough to help you understand the page. We’ve seen many times that, like all machine translation, Google Translate isn’t a perfect tool—and many times, it can’t even convey the gist of the page.

I gave it another shot this time around. This one was pretty good (original):

The Basque Government has approved in the Board meeting today, the order of the Minister of Interior, Rodolfo Ares, laying down the aid, equivalent to six months of unemployment benefits, to be received by women victims of violence gender with the goal of independence from her abuser can and facilitate their social inclusion.

This one was pretty funny (original):

Russian tycoon Mikhail Prokhorov, who a year and half ago signed a EUR 390 million to acquire Villa Leopolda, the world’s most expensive house, you lose more than 40 million by backing down on the operation.

The Russian, also gave birth to a fortune in the nickel industry that Forbes magazine estimated at some 9,500 million, tried to give up buying the house and recover the deposits of 39 million that conducted by the spectacular home located in Riviera, southeastern France. But the High Court of Nice has ruled against the billionaire and friend of Mikhail Abramovich, owner of Chelsea soccer team, lose the money advanced before the final agreement.

(Sorry about the 40M Euros you just lost.)

But, hey, that’s some of the best work we’ve seen, considering that just over a year ago when Google Reader added the service, they didn’t even try to translate 38% of the posts we looked at, and another 38% didn’t make enough sense to get the gist.

So let’s see the progress over time (Blogger Gabriel Campanario’s original English version):

Google Reader translation, 11 Nov 2008 The last time I drew one of these kiosks to buy you a coffee without getting in the car was not stopped anyone to buy anything. But this time I was lucky and it went through two cars, which is in the parking lot of North Sound Vineyard Church.
Google Docs translation, 29 Aug 2009 The last time I drew one of these kiosks to buy a coffee without get off the car did not stop anyone to buy anything. But this time I was lucky and two cars passed by it, which is in the parking lot of North Sound Vineyard Church.
Google Chrome translation (via Google Translate), 2 Mar 2010 The last time I drew one of these kiosks to buy a coffee without download car did not stop anyone to buy anything. But this time I was lucky and two cars passed by it, which is in the parking lot of North Sound Vineyard Church.

Is it just me, or are we suddenly regressing?

What do you think? Will you use Google Chrome’s translate tool—if so, do you expect it to do a better job than this?