European Search Engines Can’t Compete with Google; Whine to EU

Google appears to be in hot water over allegations that it’s deliberately penalizing rival search engines in its search results.

The European Commission, Europe’s highest antitrust authority [led by Joaquin Almunia], is currently looking into “some allegations of anticompetitive conduct in relation to search,” Almunia said in his speech in London. Although the work is at an early stage, “I am looking at the allegations very carefully,” given the importance of online search to the marketplace, Almunia added.

The commission began investigating Google in late February, spurred on by complaints from three competitors.

Two of the competitors are British search engine Foundem and French legal search engine ejustice.fr. Which will likely give Google a strong foundation in any official action. After all, I don’t recall Google complaining that Yahoo and Alta Vista were too dominant and didn’t rank “Google.com” high enough in their search results.

More Than Just A Check In Play for foursquare

While I am admittedly not too enamored with geo-location services personally there is little denying the rise in popularity. Foursquare, Gowalla and others are experiencing some of the ‘hockey stick’ growth that was once reserved for Twitter and Facebook.

The problem as of late has been the nagging question of “What else is there to do other than just ‘check in’? Make believe badges and ‘mayorships’ can only go so far with most people. Well, if foursquare can do what is being reported in ReadWriteWeb even I could find myself playing along. The site reports

Looking at life through rose-colored glasses? How about walking through your town and seeing it as the Huffington Post or the Independent Film Channel sees it? IFC announced a new campaign this morning with leading location-based social network Foursquare that will allow you to do just that. The Huffington Post launched a Foursquare layer today as well.

‘Publisher As Agency’ Trend Continues With Tribune

The Tribune Company is struggling to pull itself out of bankruptcy proceedings but it continues to try to move its business forward by becoming the latest publishing company to turn agency. This type of move by larger publishers is becoming more commonplace these days as they scramble to re-invent themselves in light of the digital ‘revolution’ that has kicked many in the tail pretty hard.

paidContent reports

With ad dollars for magazines and newspapers continuing to shrink, publishers like Meredith and Gannett have expanded the purview of their digital ad sales teams to include digital marketing services offerings outside of the content they produce. Tribune Company is the latest entrant into the interactive marketing space. The publisher, still struggling through its interminable bankruptcy proceedings, has formed a new interactive marketing consultancy called 435 Digital Services. Named for Tribune’s Chicago street address, the project will shift a small number of current ad sales staffers into the new 10-person unit, as well as making a few new hires, according to a piece in Crain’s Chicago Business.

Reddit User Hits Reputation Management Lottery

Faced with an unfavorable RipOffReport web page ranking number one for his name on Google, Reddit user Carl Herold turned to his fellow Redditors for help. On June 30th, Carl posted a message on self.AskReddit asking for advice on how to deal with a complaint from a former vendor he claims is a lie. The post received so much attention that Carl’s name was the 5th most popular search term on Google (for a time), resulting in hundreds of thousands of web pages being created mentioning Carl’s name and helping him push the unfavorable complaint to page 5 of the search results.

In Carl’s follow up post thanking Reddit he claims that:

Marketing Pilgrim is Looking for a New Blogger

UPDATE: We are no longer accepting applications. Thank you everyone!

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As you know, the fabulous Jordan McCollum has retired. :-(

So, we’re now looking for a new member of the team to help support Frank Reed, Joe Hall, and me. Here’s what we’re looking for (please read carefully):

  • Write two blog posts per day, Monday to Friday.
  • Posts must be focused around current marketing news stories–we’re not looking for “how-to” articles.
  • You must have an understanding of internet marketing and must be willing to offer your opinions/thoughts/commentary/sarcasm on any news covered.
  • You must be reliable and consistent. Two posts a day, M-F. I can’t stress that enough. Of course, there will be times when you need a vacation or can’t find anything to write about, but those will be the exceptions.

Woot! The Associated Press Gets a Taste of Its Own Medicine!

You may already be aware that The Associated Press (AP) has gone down a ludicrous path of insisting you owe them money, if you quote one of their stories.

Now it appears the news organization has been caught indulging in some double-standards, by quoting from Woot’s announcement that it had been acquired by Amazon.com. In light of this, the good-humored folks over at Woot have decided to point out the hypocrisy to AP.

So, The AP, here we are. Just to be fair about this, we’ve used your very own pricing scheme to calculate how much you owe us. By looking through the link above, and comparing your post with our original letter, we’ve figured you owe us roughly $17.50 for the content you borrowed from our blog post, which, by the way, we worked very very hard to create.

MySpace Looking for a New Ad Buddy

MySpace needs to find another company willing to pay them for the opportunity to advertise to their decreasing number of users. They need to do this at a time when their executive suite has installed a revolving door to more easily handle the traffic in and out of the offices. It also comes at a time when the best company MySpace can find itself in is in the major Internet property rehab wing with Yahoo! and Aol.

So this is not the best situation to be in especially when you had cut a deal in 2006 with Google that should have brought $900 million to MySpace during the period where Google had the advertising exclusive with them. The Wall Street Journal reports