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Nielsen Wants to Change the Way We Measure Facebook Success




Measuring success is one of those social media marketing sticking points that still has most people baffled. Traditional online metrics such as measuring click-throughs doesn’t really give you the full picture because a lot of social media campaigns are about awareness, not action. In other words, they function more like TV commercials than banner ads. This is why TV ratings leader Nielsen is working on bringing “Gross Ratings Points” to Facebook.

As explained in an article published in the Wall Street Journal, Gross Ratings Points are a metric that measures reach — “that is the size of an audience—by the “frequency” with which the audience sees a brand.

Nielsen wants to use the same terminology used for print, TV and outdoor advertising and it sounds like good way to go. So good, that comScore and Facebook are both moving forward with tools designed to capture this same metric.

comScore announced today that they’ve purchased AdXpose and will combine that with their current tools to bring “game-changing” metrics to online advertising. They’re taking the concept of GRP and going one better with what they call “Validated GRP.” They define this as “a measure of impressions that were legitimately delivered to a user, in the right context, within the right frequency range, to the desired target.”

It’s a lot to digest, but comScore has an oddly creepy video on their blog post which explains it better than I can.

The honest truth is that most of us throw whatever we can at Facebook and hope for the best. We figure every new “like” is a potential new customer and hey, you can’t not have a Facebook page, right? Maybe with this shift in metrics, we’ll finally see if posting to Facebook is time well spent, or whether we should be putting our efforts elsewhere.