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Consumers Say No to High Volume of Digital Ads



66% of consumers say they’re on the receiving end of too many digital ads and they’re not happy about it. After you file this one under, ‘not surprised,’ take a closer look at this graphic from eMarketer.

I’d like to have the email addresses for the 2% of US consumers who said they aren’t getting enough ads. Those are my kind of people.

As for those who said they were overwhelmed, they also said that they routinely ignore and / or delete messaging from frequent promoters. Even worse, 28% of US respondents said excessive marketing made them less likely to ever see the brand in a positive light.

Part of the problem here is the the proliferation of ad-carrying systems. Consumers were used to seeing ads in magazines, on TV, and on billboards. Now we add to that with email, banner ads, search ads, ads on Facebook, Twitter, and the newest of all — mobile ads by text and on apps. No wonder consumers are feeling overwhelmed.

When asked which ad outlet was the most unacceptable, 67% of US respondents said mobile phone. I’d guess their was their choice for three reasons.

1. Mobile screens are small, so ads are much more obtrusive and often block a portion of what you’re trying to read.

2. They’re inconvenient. Ever go groping for your phone in response to a text message “ping” only to find out it was an advertisement? It’s not like an email that flows into a stream while you’re working. Text ads pull you away from what you’re doing and that’s never a good thing.

3. It’s new. We’re simply not used to the whole mobile experience so it’s a turn off. In the future, our smartphones will be in line with our PC’s and we’ll be complaining about the holographic ads beamed straight to our eyes when we walk down the street.

The point is ads are often annoying, but they’re necessary and on occasion, they’re actually helpful. People don’t like to admit it, but I’d bet everyone you see today has purchased an item they enjoy after seeing an ad. Might have been the new Crunchy Sushi Taco Roll they had for lunch, the murder mystery they couldn’t put down, and maybe even that fancy smartphone that has become an extension of their left arm.

Consumers will always grumble about advertising. It’s our job to make ads more information, helpful and enjoyable so they grumble a little less.