Bad reputation in Europe? Google now has a form for that

keep-calm-and-i-forgotFrom old arrest records to inappropriate college party photos – seems like every day a CEO or celebrity is making apologies for past, bad behavior. Most of the time it’s simply embarrassing for a week and then the world moves on. But we’ve seen cases where past misdeeds have resulted in forced resignations and customer boycotts.

And though it’s usually the big chiefs we hear about, there are plenty of little fish getting caught in the old news net. Is it fair to judge a person by their past behavior? What if they’ve since moved on to bigger and better things? What if those old news stories turned out not to be true?

Europe’s top court recently decided that to forgive is divine but to be forgotten is the law.

Email Marketing: Are you outperforming the competition? Silverpop has the answer

SilverpopI heard a blogger say that her Facebook page is tanking. Only 1,000 likes this week! I almost fell off my chair. A 1,000 likes? I’ll take that any day but compared to where she was a year ago, it’s dismal.

That’s the funny thing about numbers, they really only tell a story when you compare them to other numbers. For example, how’s your email open rate? Around 18%? That’s great if you’re in the travel industry but if you’re a non-profit you’re way off the median number for the industry.

Want to know where you stand? Silverpop just released their “2014 Email Marketing Metrics Benchmark Study” and it covers the basics – bounces, open rates, click-throughs and usubs.

So you think you know social sharing . . .think again [Infographic]

Most content sharing occurs via social networks like Facebook and Twitter. We all know that, right. . . . ? RadiumOne says, “wrong”. They have a new infographic called “Six Myths of Social Sharing” and I have to admit, even I believe a few of the myths on the list.

For example, “most content sharing occurs via social networks”.  Here are the real facts according to RadiumOne:

RadiumOne Myths 1

Copy and paste? That blows my mind. An enormous amount of internet content comes with built in social or email sharing buttons but folks are still using Ctrl+C to share! Since the majority of these shares are coming from IOS devices, I think there’s more to this than meets the eye. (Excuse me Transformers for borrowing your slogan.) I’m thinking about how I might share a photo on Instagram. I find it on the internet. Save it to my photos then reupload through Instagram. Does that count as copy and paste?

Consumers are worried about internet privacy but few do anything to protect themselves

SecurityHere’s a wild set of facts:

58% of respondents to an Associated Press poll said they were worried about government spying by the National Security Agency.

41% of consumers don’t know that smart devices collect information about their personal activities.

The truth is, it’s more likely that your new refrigerator is spying on you than the NSA.

Two companies published internet privacy surveys this week, TRUSTe Privacy Index and one by Consumer Reports, and between them an interesting picture emerged.

Though more than 80% of people said they were concerned about privacy on the internet and from smart devices 62% haven’t done anything about it.

Does your marketing gel with your social customer service team? [infographic]

Not since chocolate met peanut butter has a partnership been as important as marketing and customer service. With social media playing an increasingly important role in customer service, does your marketing team work closely with your customer service folks?

 social-customer-service-marketersVia Sentiment Metrics

 

Planning a vacation: value trumps loyalty and search engines rule

Booking a vacation used to be a job for a qualified professional, but now everyone’s a travel agent thanks to sites like Kayak, Orbitz and Expedia. But online booking sites come in second to the good old, everyday search engine.

The Great American Vacation Study: How Travelers Seek, Shop and Save,” from parago takes an in-depth look at how Americans are planning their leisure travel and I think there’s a lot to learn here – even if you’re not specifically in the travel industry.

It starts with a big number. 90% of the people who responded said they travel for leisure at least once a year. 82% of women and 74% of men always or almost always plan the trip themselves. I don’t know if that speaks to the ease of online bookings or a rise in our need to control all things.

Shoppers shout ‘I am not a number!’

oe9N7VseBay has been hiding things from me. I suspected it was true and now I know I’m not being paranoid. When I search, I only get back a portion of the items available for that keyword.

They say it’s for my own good. That they’re helping me weed through the clutter so I can get the best item for the best price. But frankly, I’d rather wade through an extra page of listings than have a computer decide what I should buy.

McCann Truth Central’s “Truth About Shopping” says that consumers are getting tired of being treated as part of an algorithm. Which is not to say they don’t like personalized service. The difference falls somewhere between personal and personalization.