Posted January 16, 2015 4:37 pm by with 0 comments

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Scroll RateScrolling, scrolling, scrolling; keep those users rolling. Footers now are golden, don’t hide! Forget the olden fold rule, just use the mobile phone tools, and let this infographic be your guide!

(Extra points to anyone who sang along!)

Content Square just sent over a sweet infographic on a topic I haven’t seen covered in ages. Yes, you guessed it; the scroll.

Before the days of smartphones and tablets, web designers were warned about keeping all of the important information “above the fold”. That was a throwback to the newspaper days but it made sense. Studies showed that people didn’t like to scroll. If they couldn’t see it as soon as they hit a page, they moved on.

But it’s a new day and things have changed in two ways. First; the placement of “the fold” is no longer as constant as it was thanks to mobile.

Internet Scroll

As you can see, screen height has changed the way we view the fold. The average monitor shows 850 pixels but look at the difference between a PC monitor and a smartphone. With mobile, you’re seeing between 2000 px and 3400 px. And since phones and tablets have larger screens than ever before, we’re seeing even more of the page than we did two years ago.

Since smartphones and tablets are more narrow than monitors, we could be losing on the sides everything we gain in length. That’s okay because scroll rate has increased on every device and rose 42% overall in the past year.

Not only are people scrolling; 15% of internet users hit bottom – that is, they scroll all the way to the footer. This is up 200% in 3 years.

Content Square saved the best news for last; scrollers are buyers.

Content Square Scroll Rate BuyersWhen people can use their finger to scroll, they scroll more often and they buy. On a tablet, buyers scroll 25% more than non-buyers. On a smartphone, it’s 23% but the overall scroll rate is higher. I guess we’re just used to the easy flicking motion on our phones.

What all of this means is that you need to pay close attention to every section of your webpage. The longer a person stays on your page, the more likely they are to buy something. So lead with your best, but put some surprises down below as a reward for those who stick around.

Without looking. . . what’s in your footer?