About Cynthia Boris

Cynthia Boris is a freelance writer, social media consultant and a firm believer that content is still king. A former magazine staff writer and book author, she now devotes all of her time to the world wide web.

Facebook changes news feed again, warns page owners this might result in ‘less distribution over time’

Facebook just made another change to the News Feed algorithm and this time they’re being upfront about the fact that it may (will) cause another drop in Page engagement. Points for honesty?

This update is all about the trending post. The average person often posts about TV shows and movies and news when it’s a breaking story. You’ll see a lot of this over the next few weeks as the TV networks roll out their new season. Oh look, Kristen Wiig is trending. . . .

Facebook_trending_headlineUnder the new rules this post will show up higher in your news feed than that random post from your mother. If Caroline were to post this same update two weeks from now, it wouldn’t rise to the top because it’s old news – sorry Kristen – you only get a few moments in the Facebook sun from now on.

In two years, mobile video viewers have increased 400 percent

There’s a very good chance that your customers are watching a video on their smartphone or tablet as we speak. Ooyala says that mobile video views have increased 400% in the last two years, doubling in the last year alone. Right now, 25% of all video views are happening on a mobile device and that number is expected to double again by 2016.

For those who prefer a visual representation, here’s one from the Ooyala Q2 2014 Global Video Index Report:

Ooyala mobile video growth

Look at that! That’s quite a climb.

There are a number of factors that contributed to this pretty picture; devices with bigger screens, more access to fast connection speeds, an increase in the number of videos being uploaded every day and then there’s the young millennial factor.

To gain a customer’s trust; meet them on their preferred digital stomping ground

Trust MeTrust is the number one, most important factor in getting and maintaining a relationship with a customer. People have to believe that they’re going to get their money’s worth, that their personal information will be kept safe and that they’ll receive what they ordered in a timely manner. No problem for Amazon, Target or Disney but what if you’re Susie Woosy’s Sleepytime Toys or Fred’s Fish-o-rama? New businesses (by calendar date or simply new to this customer) have to earn that trust before the average customer hands over the credit card a second time, and a third.

A new survey from SDL says it takes two years before the average customer fully trusts a brand and five years before a customer commits to a “Greater than Average” spend.

Millennials expect businesses to help solve the world’s problems

Quality products – check

Good prices – check

Environmentally friendly manufacturing with a portion of the profits going to a global education organization. . . . better check that box if you want the millennials to buy what you’re selling.

MSLGROUP asked 8,000 millennials in 17-countries to talk about business and citizenship. 83% said they wanted to see businesses get more actively involved in making the world a better place.

MSLGROUP Millennials Infographic

The millennials in the survey said they believe businesses have the power to make meaningful changes at both the global and local level. It’s not enough to donate money to a world health organization or change to environmentally friendly packaging. Millennials want to see activism and change in this country and in their own city. Top on their list, inflation, healthcare costs, the recession. They want to earn a decent wage, pay their bills, take care of their families and not have to worry about how they’re going to put food on the table. Certainly, not too much to ask.

Google’s biggest spender could be their next biggest competitor

Last year, Amazon spent $157.7 million on Google U.S. search ads. As this chart from AdAge shows, they were the number one buyer of ads by far, which is ironic since they’re actively working on an advertising network of their own.

Google This Adage

Yep, Amazon is paying big money to a company they hope to compete with in the future. It’s really not all that surprising. Custora says almost 44% of all US ecommerce transactions in Q1 2014 began with a search engine. And though there are other ways of searching the internet, no one can deny that Google is king. Even Amazon can’t take that away from them.

Here are a few more stats from Google:

Gucci, Sony and Jack Daniels kick off Flipboard’s new video advertising program

Flipboard GucciThe biggest advantage digital magazines have over print magazines is the ability to interact with the reader. With a simple tap the reader can open a slide show, listen to a sound bite or watch a story unfold before their eyes.

Now, Flipboard is bringing that same level of interactivity to the magazine ad.

Flipboard is a personalized magazine app that runs on everything from iOS to Blackberry. You choose your content by selecting topics or specific magazines that you want to follow. Flipboard covers New York Fashion Week but they also cover Treehouses and everything in between. Each page features a stunning, artsy photo with a small amount of text. If you want to read more, you click and are redirected to the original source on the web. Not interested, scroll and watch the pages “flip” as if you were skimming through a magazine.

iTunes posts instructions on how to look a gift horse in the mouth

It sounded like a good idea when they came up with it. Get U2 to perform at the big Apple announcement event then give their newest album “Songs of Innocence” to every iTunes user for FREE. It will show Apple’s commitment to being fun and innovative. It’s a sweet way to reward the loyal users and it will generate a ton of press. . . a win, win, win!

Apple should have known better.

This is one of the tamer responses: