The Over Sixty-Fives Stake Their Claim on the Internet

With every passing day, more and more Baby Boomers are crossing that mystical line labeled 65. It may only be 12 months older than 64, but culturally, those 12 months make a big difference.

As a nation, we’ve come to think of 65 as old, probably because of its standing as the legal retirement age. But honestly, how many people are actually retiring at 65? How many can afford to?

One thing is for sure, this generation’s 65, isn’t the same as the one before it. These sexagenarian’s are still getting things done and 53% of them are doing it on the internet.

According new data from the Pew Internet and American Life Project, this is the first time usage in the over 65 group has crossed the 50% mark. And once they’re online, they stay there, with 70% saying they use the internet on a typical day.

Why Shoppers Love Online Most of the Time

Nielsen published a simple chart today that defines how consumers feel about in-store, online, and mobile shopping.

What’s exciting to see, is that online shopping came out on top, beating the other two in three out of five categories.

Take a look at the chart and then we’ll talk.

Let’s work backwards starting with Safest. No surprise that mobile barely registers on the safe scale, but I’m surprised by how low online is as compared to in-store. It appears that people still worry about sending their credit card information into the great beyond, but they’re not afraid to hand their card over to a store. I’ve had my credit card information stolen only once and it happened when thieves siphoned off the data from my local grocery store.

Foursquare Reinvents Itself as a Discovery Engine

I suppose if I spent much of my life traveling to new places, I’d be excited by an app that easily allows me to tell people where I am. But I don’t, so I wasn’t and after a brief dalliance, I cut Foursquare out of my life.

Today, I’m reconsidering renewing our relationship because Foursquare says it’s changed and this time it’s not just playing games, it’s going to be helpful.

The new Foursquare, to use their own words, is prettier and includes a snazzy new Explore. Check-ins are still encouraged but the emphasis is now on discovering new places to visit relative to where you are right now.

Since it is first and foremost, a social app, it opens to your friends page with a quick look at the latest activity.

Airtime Aims to Put the Surprise Back in Social

Bored? Lonely? Want to spend a little time chatting with a total stranger who loves all the things you love? Fire up Airtime and in minutes, you’ll be talking live with a real woman who speaks your language.

Okay, so it sounds like one of those sleazy, chatlines they advertise on late night TV, but Airtime is actually the next big thing in online chatting. It comes to you from Napster founders Sean Parker and Shawn Fanning, two guys who want to put the surprise and wonder back into internet hook-ups.

Let’s begin by looking at the cool, quirky, but slightly frightening banner they use on the site.

Study Says Majority of Shoppers Choose Price Over Brand

Financial analysts say the economy is on an upswing, but consumers are still cautious about spending. According to a new study from Parago, American shoppers are routinely choosing price over brand and that could hurt small retailers on the web.

After long months of rampant unemployment, high gas prices, and a poor housing market, consumers are feeling hard pressed to keep up. 70% said they were more sensitive to price and 83% said they felt their purchase power was the same or less than it was a year ago.

Because of this, 66% of those surveyed said price was the primary factor in deciding what to purchase. This is up from 60% last year.

Study Shows Video Adds Significant Boost to Mobile Ad Engagement

I’ve become somewhat of an iPad junkie in the past few months. I use it for reading, games, shopping, and social interaction. What I’ve noticed is an increase in video ads. Even more importantly, I’ve noticed an increase in my own click-through percentage.

While I rarely click on a video ad online, I often click them on the iPad. Often I do it because the ad comes with a reward. Also, I’m usually working on the computer, but the iPad is fun time, so the video ads don’t feel as disruptive. Whatever the reason, video ads are getting the job done and that lines up nicely with the results of a new study by Medialets.

4 Out of 5 Facebook Users Have Never Been Influenced by Ads or Comments

An impromptu study by Marketing Pilgrim shows that 4 out of 5 marketers laughed when they saw the title of this post.

Yes, we’re going to talk about how Facebook is overvalued. . . . again.

This time, it stems from a Reuters/Ipsos online poll about Facebook usage. Right off the bat, they found that 34% of those surveyed were spending less time on the site. 20% said they were spending more time. Hang on while I do the math (34 minus 20, negative sign, percentage), yep, that still equals lost eyeballs.

It doesn’t stop there. Seems that Facebook’s stock troubles has made 44% of the respondents think less of the popular social media site. Now, I’m not a huge fan of the company, but I don’t think they’re directly to blame for the dropping stock prices. It’s not their fault that everyone believed the hype.