Mobile Commerce Dollars Nearly Double But Not Everyone is Buying

Statistics are a funny thing. 118% growth and 6.7 billion sound like great numbers. But let’s take a look at how things really add up.

This chart from eMarketer shows some amazing growth in the mobile commerce market. Look at that 118.8% increase in 2010. Sounds great, until you realize that prior to 2010, mobile commerce didn’t really exist. It was just people using the internet access on their phones in order to buy something.

The dollar hop from $3.5 billion to $6.7 billion in 2011 is very nice. But folks spent $37.2 billion online just this past holiday season alone. So, it’s still a very small part of overall spending.

I’m not knocking mobile, or the rise in m-commerce. I just want to look at it with glasses that aren’t tinted a rose color.

Consumers Still Don’t Know What to Do with QR Codes

QR codes are popping up everywhere. Not long ago, these mysterious patterned squares could be found in an occasional magazine or on a mailer. Now you can find them on grocery displays, packaging, even on bus shelters.

More QR codes must mean more people are using them! Right? Sort of. A new study from Chadwick Martin Bailey shows that people are scanning, but they don’t know what do with the results.

Here’s a visual from Marketing Charts:

I’m part of that top line, too. When QR codes were new, I scanned them all the time. Now, I rarely bother. I find that most codes just lead me to a website that I could have arrived at more easily by typing in the URL. Other than that, I’ve been led to a few recipes and some behind the scenes videos for movies. Nothing thrilling and certainly nothing worth sharing.

Online Influences Almost Two-Thirds of Toy Purchases

When I was a kid, holiday toy shopping for my mom meant cracking open the Sears Wish Book. She’d chose the items from our lists, call in the order and everything would arrive on the doorstep a few days later. No need to step inside a toy store at all.

Times haven’t changed all that much. Today, parents are still avoiding the aisles by doing a large amount of toy shopping online. Even when they don’t buy online, the internet is influencing their decisions on what to buy. Check out this chart from the new Google study “The Role of Digital in the Toy Shopper’s Journey.”

YouTube and Netflix Share Top Honors in November 2011

Today we ponder the question, if people stopped loading videos on the internet right now, how long would it take to watch everything that’s already been submitted?

These are the kinds of things that keep me up at night. It’s like calculating how long it would take me to watch every minute of every DVD I own. I don’t know that either feat could be accomplished in the time we have on this earth.

According to Nielsen, 166.9 million unique US viewers watched nearly 22 billion videos in November 2011. In January of 2011, the unique viewer number was 143,930 watching almost 15 billion videos. That’s quite a jump in only ten months.

Everything Old is New Again: the Comeback Kids of 2012

People say they want something new and different, but the truth is, we gravitate toward old, familiar images and brands. Sometimes these brands return with a clever, modern update (Can you say, “Old Spice.”) Other times, it’s just the mere reminder of why we loved them in the first place that makes us a fan all over again.

Forbes has just released their list of brands they expect to make a comeback in 2012. Let’s take a look and see if you agree.

The Muppets

This one is a no-brainer, since they’re already on the upswing. Back in November, The Muppets released a new movie which, ironically, was all about them making a comeback. Since then, Kermit and friends have been popping up everywhere, reigniting original fans and bringing in a new, teen audience.

Online Retail Clubs Push Quality Over Quantity

I spent my New Year’s weekend watching a Project Runway marathon. At least once per episode, I saw a commercial for a website called JustFab.com. In it, a group of women are the office, they’re all looking at the same computer monitor as they “ooh” and “wow” and their eyes are dilating and they’re getting all excited. Obviously, you’re supposed to think they’re looking at content that isn’t work safe, but it turns out it’s all over shoes.

Personally, I believe shoes are like cars. As long as they get you where you’re going, that’s all I care about. But I hear tell, that shoe buying can be a karmic experience for some women and so you would think that the bigger the better, but not in this case.

iPad 2: How Low Will Apple Go?

There are lots of rumors flying this morning about a potential, hefty price drop in iPad 2 when the iPad 3 comes to market. On the surface, this doesn’t seem like news at all. It makes sense to discount older versions of technology in order to make way for the new, but how low will Apple go? That’s the big question.

It all stems from a report that claims Apple is going to release two versions of iPad 3, one with more bells and whistles than any human being could actually ever need, and a more basic upgrade. The idea is to give them a range of price points from $499 to $399 and then the assumed $299 for the old iPad 2.