Second-Screen Branding: The Future of TV Advertising

Yesterday, I went to Walgreens. It’s not my first choice for drugstores, but I figured I’d give it a try. Why? Because last Sunday, I spent three hours watching a Walgreens challenge on Celebrity Apprentice. The celebs had to make a presentation for the new Walk with Walgreens program and it was all over my second screen app.

Walgreens was drilled into my brain and I liked it because I was watching a fun show on TV and playing a game on my iPad. Yes, I’m a walking, talking example of how second-screen branding works. At least I’m not alone.

Which Retailer Is the Most Relevant? Amazon!

What retailer, would you say, is the most dependable? Reflects your personal values? Is a store you’re proud to mention to your friends?

Brodeur Partners asked 2,000 shoppers these questions and Amazon came out on top again and again. They even scored in the top two for “sensory relevance,” which deals with a store’s atmosphere and appeal. Yes, the store that doesn’t even have a “store” came in second behind Target.

Here are the top ten stores:

Jerry Johnson, Brodeur’s executive vice president of strategic planning said in a press release,

“The case of Amazon.com highlights the incredible power of e-commerce in the retail world of today. It shows how technology can move a retailer from specialty online bookstore to one that people view as more practical and value-driven than Wal-Mart, the world’s largest retailer.”

Roadblocks to Innovation: How to Keep Moving Forward in Business

Kraft has been making cheese since the early 1920’s. They’re a well-respected brand and a leader in the business. Still, they can’t simply rest on their laurels. They have to keep coming up with new products, like Fresh Take. This product creates a crunchy, flavorful cheese and crumb coating with almost no mess. The secret is their dual bag that magically zips open to become a mixing bowl and crumb shaker. Kraft took a kitchen chore (breading meats) and turned it into a fast and easy option for dinner.

Innovation is necessary if a company wants to grow, but it’s one of the hardest elements of running a business. Particularly when you’ve been around as long as Kraft has. It’s hard because innovation is a creative process and our days are generally anti-creative for a variety of reasons.

Google Offers SMB Mobile Site Free For One Year

Yesterday, I asked you what smartphone users would see when they accessed your website through their phone. Does it deliver or does it fall short?

If you chose the second answer, have I got a deal for you. Google Mobile (aka GoMo) has teamed up with DudaMobile to help small businesses set up mobile-friendly websites.

The step-by-step system automatically converts your current website to mobile. Then it allows you to add important touches such as click-to-call, mobile maps and Adsense.

Obviously, this only works with sites that are light on the bells and whistles. Flash and e-commerce won’t translate but it’s an excellent opportunity for the small business owner who needs to get the basics to customers. To add to the incentive, they’re even going to host your mobile site for free for one year.

App and Mobile Browsing Up Nearly 5% Over Last Year

Depending on your half full / half empty point of view, a 5% increase in mobile activity is good / not that great.

comScore’s latest report shows that 49.5% of mobile subscribers downloaded apps in the past ninety days. That’s an increase of 4.6% over the three month average from late last year. (Check out the chart for specifics.)

But considering the constant barrage of new apps in the market, and Google’s new push with Google Play, I would have thought the number would be higher.

Then again, given that we’re looking at only about half a year’s time, a near 5% jump isn’t that bad. And, as you can see, there was an increase in all types of mobile activity including playing games and social networking.

Talking Baseball and the Younger Generation

Baseball season is upon us and though I am strictly an NHL gal, I understand the marketing potential of what many consider is America’s pastime.

Scarborough Sports Marketing just released a new study and infographic which shows that 49% of all American adults are Major League Baseball fans and 15% consider themselves “avid fans.”

What’s surprising is that 44% of Generation Y respondents said they were fans and 13% said they were an “avid fan.” Surprising, because we generally think of the 18-29 group as technology buffs who prefer Wii games to “we” games. But these numbers from Scarborough show that even though baseball card collecting isn’t as popular as it used to be, watching the games live and on TV still rules.

Influence, Popularity and Profits: Which One Begats the Other?

It’s good to be popular. It means people like you. They want to hang with you and they’re interested in what you have to say. On Facebook, that means a lot of people want to be your friend. If you’re a brand, they like your page.

Popular means you have a great deal of influence over those that follow you. Or does it?

Brian Solis talks about the difference between popularity and influence in an article on PaidContent.org. He states that influence is a combination of three factors. One is reach. Popular people have that due to the large number of followers on Facebook or Twitter.

Second is Relevance. Justin Bieber has great reach, but that doesn’t mean he’s the best person to Tweet about life insurance or pharmaceuticals.