Two-Thirds of All Online Moms are on Facebook

Marketing to moms? Facebook has you covered. According to new numbers from eMarketer, 23 million US moms use the social media service at least once a month. That’s equal to two-thirds of all online moms (defined as females over 18 with children under 18).

Then again, you know how statistics are, because even though 23 million sounds like a lot, it only represents 17.4% of Facebook users and that number is going down.

eMarketer also notes that in the next few years, the current heavy penetration will work against the mom brigade and growth will be slow. By 2013, they say moms will only account for 16.1% of the total Facebook population.

Take This Lollipop Demos the Horror of Cyberstalking

Facebook privacy is an oxymoron. The site is designed to reveal your personal information to the rest of the world. Where you live. Where you went to school. Your favorite stores and music. For friends, it’s a source of conversation. For marketers, it’s a way to target potential customers and for stalkers, it’s like giving the alarm code for Tiffany’s to a jewel thief.

Not worried? You might have a different view after you check out “Take This Lollipop.” The interactive website lets you look over the shoulder of a very creepy, cyberstalker as he peruses your Facebook profile. At first it’s not that unusual. Dozens of websites, like the one for the new movie The Thing, use your profile data to populate their online world. But when the stalker looks up your address on Google maps then jumps in the car and drives off, fake or not, it had me checking the locks on my door.

TV and Tablets: Let the Multitasking Begin

Remember when TV commercial breaks were used to grab a snack from the kitchen? Now, people are using commercial breaks to look up coupons for snacks, chat with friends and check their email. It’s not enough that we multitask all day long at work, but now, thanks to tablets and smartphones, we’re doing it during our leisure hours, too.

New numbers from Nielsen show that 42% of tablet owners use the device daily while watching TV. 40% of smartphone owners reported the same with up to 24% saying they did it at least a few times a week.

What are they doing on those devices? Mostly checking email, but social networking was also popular with women. Men were more likely to check sports scores and 46% simply took their browser for a spin to see what’s what.

New Social Network Pays You to Chime.In

For all of you who got up this morning thinking, “I wish there was a new social network I could join,” I’ve got good news for you. As of this very morning, you can sign up and start contributing to Chime.in, a complete new and different kind of social media site.

Okay, I could hardly write that last sentence without laughing, but I do give owners UberMedia props for trying.

Chime.in is a cross between Twitter and Google+. Users can post a photo, video, link or up to a 2,000 character “chime.” Then others can comment on the chime and voila – you’re communicating with the outside world.

What makes Chime.in unusual is that you can follow interests in addition to people. There’s a long list of interests to choose from including TV, movies, technology, fitness, specific sports, politics, and even chemistry.

No Love for Luvs: The Worst Ads in America

The people have spoken and Consumerist has tallied the votes. The Worst Ad in America 2011 is Luv’s Diapers “Poop, There it is.” And they couldn’t have made a better choice.

It can be hard to advertise diapers without going into the realm of bodily functions, but this nasty commercial takes the. . . dare I say. . . cake? It’s even worse than last year’s offensive ad by Huggies where they implied that babies were sexy when they wore their new line of jeans diapers. Yikes.

Other best of the worst ads includes the new AT&T commercial where the wife (whom I thought was the man’s mother) goes off on her geeky husband when he tells her he signed up for a new texting plan and the AT&T spider spot. Yuck.

Got Milk? Online Grocery Shopping Soars in Asia, Fails in US

No one in the US thinks twice about buying a book or DVD online, but when it comes to groceries, that’s a whole different mind set.

According to Nielsen’s 2011 Global Online Survey, only 20% of Americans said they were likely to try online grocery shopping. Compare that to Asia where 77% of the respondents said they were happy to have their dinner ingredients delivered. The numbers were also pretty high for the Middle East/Africa (48%) and Latin America (51%) all saying they were likely to shop for groceries online for home delivery.

Sears Embraces Online for Offline with in Store WiFi and iPad Access

A few weeks ago, I went to Best Buy to purchase a new printer. We got it down to two options and wanted to compare the specs but a lot of the information was missing from the shelf tag.

Next best thing, ask the salesman, who politely suggested we could find that information online. Good idea, except that my favorite electronics retailer doesn’t offer free in-store WiFi and 3G connection within their walls is spotty and highly reliant on standing in exactly the right spot.

How sad is it when technology retailer can’t get the tech right?

Enter Sears, America’s die-hard, age-old, retail institution. This holiday season, they’ll not only be offering free WiFi at many of their locations, they’ll be encouraging shoppers to go online while shopping in their stores.