Engagement over display: Video leads the way in online ad growth

October-2019-PDF-Calendar-Style-6-PNG“Static display ads are so 2014!”

That’s what they’re going to be saying in 2019, when video ads rule the internet airwaves.

Forrester just released their latest North American Online Display Advertising Forecast and the numbers are incredible.

They predict that US online display advertising will grow from $19.8 billion this year to $37.6 billion in 2019. That’s a compound annual growth rate of 13.7%.

By comparison, the offline market is expected to grow at an average annual rate of only 1%. Dollar wise, offline is still way ahead of online with a whopping $239 billion in revenue but it’s a continuation of a shift that started a few years ago.

Fueling the online fire is the move from static (or bouncing) banner ads to truly interactive, engaging forms of advertising.

LinkedIn adds cause and effect to ‘who viewed’ chart

Social media networks are like living, breathing beasts – you have to constantly feed them if you want them to work for you. LinkedIn just added a feature to the “Who’s Viewed Your LinkedIn Profile” graph that illustrates this beautifully.

It’s all about cause and effect; lining up actions you took with the views that came after.

LinkedIn Who Viewed Chart

To find this graph, login to LinkedIn then hover over Profile. The “Who’s Viewed” option will appear below. (If you haven’t ever clicked this link, you’ll get a cute video about a young job seeker and a croissant baker in France. Oui! Oui!)

The thin blue line represents views of your profile. On January 11, 16 people checked out Demo Man.

Friday Roundup: Facebook cans spam, LinkedIn spruces up Pulse and more

Halloween storeIts the end of the first week of October. Halloween is in full bloom and fourth-quarter madness is slowly spreading through the retail world. How are you doing? While you ponder that question, let’s take a look at a couple of stories that didn’t make it on to Marketing Pilgrim this week.

Facebook Cans Spam

Facebook put up a long post today on the business blog with a veiled warning to Page owners – don’t buy likes or artificially inflate your pages. We’ll find you and punish you.

But they didn’t want to be that blatant, so they made it about the spammers instead:

How will the holiday season Treat your business this Tricky time of year?

27 days from now, your neighborhood will be filled with little monsters running through the streets in search of candy. If you run an online-only business, that means there’s precious little time left to snag those Halloween customers.

This infographic from Collective Bias, called “The Rise of the Halloween Shopper” shows that next week is the prime shopping time for all things spooky.

Collective Bias Halloween Dates

Hopefully, you’re already set to sell because Halloween is not a season you want to miss. It’s the second-highest grossing commercial holiday after Christmas. Seriously, just look at these numbers:

Collective Bias Halloween Dollars

$69 billion spent on costumes for people and pets, treats and parties. $2.08 billion on just candy and $360 million on greeting cards.

IAB takes a global look at what works and why

Live Tweeting BadgerStuck in a marketing rut? The Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) just released their first ever “What Works & Why: IAB Global Insights Report” which includes highlights of award-winning digital campaigns from around the world.

Last year, the IAB released a similar report but only included winners from the US. This year they included works from 14 countries such as Australia, Chile, Germany, Italy, South Africa, Sweden and the UK.

And since we’re talking digital content, the “report” is actually a website where you can click through to read case studies, watch videos, view the images and get insight from a team of global experts. It’s worth exploring and it could help you hone in on your next big campaign.

Here are a few of my favorites:

Facebook lays down new rules for social media researchers

Facebook researchWhen people found out that they were unknowingly being used as virtual guinea pigs in a Facebook social experiment, they got angry. The researchers were surprised and the Facebook tech team was “unprepared for the reaction the paper received when it was published.”

I’m not surprised by either response. People don’t like it when they feel like they’ve been tricked and researchers and techies have a tendency to be narrowly focused on the goal. You can tell me I’m unfairly painting these groups with a broad brush but in the majority of cases it’s true. It has to be true – because it’s how they get the work done. A researcher can’t get personally or emotionally involved with the subjects in an experiment because it would taint the results. It’s not a jab, it’s how it is.

German regulator tells Google to stop mixing and matching data

puzzles-compilation-1440672-2-mThe Hamburg Commissioner of Data Protection and Freedom of Information (HmbBfDI) gave Google a tongue-lashing this week saying that Google’s profiling practices affects the privacy of users “beyond the admissible degree.”

The main concern is Google’s ability to mix and match data from various Google properties in order to build a more detailed user profile.

Google does not use sensitive, personal information for advertising purposes but the German regulator is still concerned about the depth of information that Google can get its hands on.

A press release from the Hamburg Commissioner of Data Protection and Freedom of Information states:

[By combining information from different products] it may be possible:

  • to compile detailed travel profiles by evaluating location data,
  • to detect specific interests and preferences by evaluating search engine use,