Back-to-school shopping is a family affair [Infographic]

Families Shop Together BaynoteMom might have control of the wallet but when it comes to back-to-school shopping, what they buy is a family affair.

According to a new study and infographic from Baynote, 70% of parents will bring their children along with them when they shop in-store for back-to-school supplies.

Only 36% include their children when they shop online but here’s an interesting thing; though most back-to-school shopping happens at a brick and mortar store, the percentage of online shopping increases as students age.

On average, respondents say 64% of their shopping will be in-store, the rest online via computer or mobile device. But the online percentage is much higher when people shop for college students.

Amazon Wallet takes the online retailer into the real world

Amazon WalletThere’s been a lot of talk about Amazon getting into the mobile payment market and it looks like they’re taking the first step with a new app. Amazon Wallet is now available for Android users through the AmazonApp store and Google Play. It’s listed as a Beta release and that’s good, because this little piggy has a long way to go.

As it stands now, the app only does one thing. It keeps track of your loyalty and gift cards so you don’t have to carry them around in your wallet. . . except when you have to. (Says Amazon: Physical gift cards may be necessary for redemption in some locations or may contain additional useful information. Keep your physical gift card in a safe place even after uploading it to your Amazon Wallet.)

Online retailers say paid search is tops for customer acquisition

SOROWhat would you say is the most effective marketing tactics for acquiring new customers?

85% of retailers in the new 2014 Shop.org/Forrester Research Inc. State of Retailing Online study, said paid search.

Only 81 retailers participated in the survey, which was conducted through May and June of 2014, but even if the number was 810 the result likely would have been the same.

Search still works. It’s familiar to both marketers and customers and as long as Google keeps turning out excellent results, paid search will continue to be a blockbuster. Think about all the things you looked for on the internet this week. How many times did that search begin with Google or Bing? I search for a lot of things on eBay and I find that I get better results from Google than on eBay itself. Same for Twitter. It’s simply a more effective way of finding information and we all know it.

Sports apps have the highest abandonment rate. How sticky is your app?

When we talk about an app being sticky, we’re not talking about candy-coated fingers on a mobile phone. Sticky is the icky term mobile mavens use to evaluate app loyalty. And if you thought getting people to download an app was tough, wait until you see what it takes to keep them coming back on regular basis!

According to this infographic by Localytics , 20% of apps are only opened once! Also, if an app is only opened once in 7 days, there’s a 60% chance it will never be opened again. Wow.

Localytics Apps

Sports apps have the highest abandonment rate. I wonder if that’s because sports are so seasonal. Every hockey season, I download an NHL app then I delete it when the season is over. Games also have a pretty high abandonment rate. I’d guess this is because once you try it you find that it’s too easy or too boring.

Save now, read later: Facebook adds bookmarking option to posts

The downside of Facebook’s popularity is that you’re hit with way more information than you can process in one sitting. This is especially bad news for marketers because even though I might like your product, I’m going to pass right by if I’m too busy to read your post when it pops.

Solution: Facebook Save

IntroducingSave

Save is Facebook’s version of what everyone else calls bookmarking. Save let’s you save posts to explore further when you have more time or when the time is more appropriate. Some posts will have a Save button at the bottom, otherwise you click the drop down arrow in the upper right corner and choose Save. It’s right above “I don’t want to see this” and “unfollow.”

Read all you want for less than the cost of a single book: Kindle Unlimited

KindleUnlimitedOne thing that’s always bothered me about ebooks is that on Amazon, they’re nearly as expensive, and sometimes more expensive than buying a printed book. “Capital in the Twenty-First Century” will cost you $19.99 as an ebook but only $23.95 in hardcover. Maybe that’s part of the reason people haven’t abandoned print books altogether.

To combat the cover price problem, Amazon has launched Kindle Unlimited. For only $9.99 a month, you can read as many of the available 600,000 books as you can squeeze in. You can even listen to the audio versions.

I have to say it. . . it’s Netflix of books. I dig it.

F-commerce, T-commerce, P-commerce: Social media tries again

Facebook Buy ButtonWe’ve been working on ways to sell products from social media for awhile now and so far it hasn’t been much of a success. There have been a few short-term hits, like buying your friend a cup of Starbucks coffee on Twitter and Facebook’s Buy-a-Gift program. (Can that actually be called a success?)

Now, the top three social networks are trying again:

Facebook’s Call-To-Buy Button

Facebook is testing a new “click to buy” button as a call-to-action option on Facebook ads. Somehow this smart button allows the consumer to buy the item without leaving Facebook. Security worries? Facebook says they have that covered.

None of the credit or debit card information people share with Facebook when completing a transaction will be shared with other advertisers, and people can select whether or not they’d like to save payment information for future purchases.