Women Love a Sensitive Man

Don’t worry, you didn’t accidentally stumble upon a new relationship blog, this is still Marketing Pilgrim, but today we’re going to talk about the softer side of men. According to January’s Women and NBCU’s Brand Power Index, women are warming up to marketing campaigns that show men as emotional and sensitive.

Melissa Lavigne-Delville, VP of Trends and Strategic Insights for Women at NBCU says;

“After a year of advertising that touted the ‘alpha male,’ with campaigns like Dockers’ ‘Wear the Pants’ or Dodge’s ‘Man’s Last Stand,’ we are seeing a noticeable shift in the marketplace as brands break down gender stereotypes in their ads and portray a less traditional and more sensitive, family-centric male.”

The Internet is Key for Community Involvement

The internet is famous for its ability to connect us with people all over the world, but a new survey from the Pew Internet and American Life project shows that it’s also important on a local level.

The study, which was conducted in San Jose, Calif., Philadelphia and Macon, Ga. was designed to measure the effectiveness of local, community and civic communications.

The majority of respondents agreed that access to a broadband connection was very important and 34% said that having the internet majorly impacted their ability to participate in the community.

Oddly, the survey found that many people with broadband connections were more critical of their local government which could be based on the fact that they have more access to information. If you don’t see all the people complaining about the road construction, you may think the city is handling the issue just fine.

Ad Trade Groups Set Out to Make Measurement Makes Sense

Three top advertising trade agencies are banning together to work on a new initiative they call “Making Measurement Make Sense.” What they want to do is work out a new standard for measuring the success of digital advertising that can be used across the board.

The IAB (Interactive Advertising Bureau), the ANA (Association of National Advertisers) and the 4A’s (American Association of Advertising Agencies) announced their new initiative at IAB’s fourth Annual Leadership Meeting, Ecosystem 2.0: The People vs. Data.

According to their press release, “Making Measurement Make Sense” has three primary objectives:

  • Define standard metrics and measurement systems that are transparent and consistent to simplify the planning, buying and evaluating of digital media:
    • Analyzing the current digital measurement situation from a business perspective

Facebook: You’ll Share it and Like it!

Let me share something with you. Facebook has changed the functionality of their “like” button on third-party sites so it acts pretty much like a “share” button. For marketers, this is good news because the action now carries with it, a photo and a summary paragraph making the link much more visible when it hits Facebook.

Here’s how it looks on Facebook when I clicked “like” on a Marketing Pilgrim article.

The downside for some, comes from the meaning of the words not the intent. I might share all the links I like, but I don’t always like all the links I share. It’s a categorical syllogism and it’s got some people worried that it will cause a drop off in clicks. I doubt it, since I don’t think most people had a clue what would happen when they clicked a “like” button before the change.

Google Update: Who Are the Biggest Losers?

When Google set its sights on removing content farms from search results, everyone expected Demand Media to be the biggest loser. But according to a data set provided by Sistrex Demand Media’s biggest offender eHow, not only didn’t take the bullet, they actually gained in a few areas.

So who did take the hit? Sistrex compared one million keywords before and after the change and announced that the top three biggest losers were WiseGeek.com, ezinearticles and Suite 101.

WiseGeek’s owner told the Wall Street Journal:

“We got unfairly lumped with a lot of players that had much lower-quality content. We’re not perfect, but I vouch for the quality of our content.”

What Exactly Are We Trying to Keep Private on the Internet?

Most people would think twice about typing their social security number into an online profile, but what about your driver’s license number? What about your grades? The organizations that you work for or even your mother’s maiden name?

The Center for Media Design at Ball University conducted a very interesting study about what kinds of information people are willing to share. Rather than hand out a questionnaire, they asked the students to write down categories of personal information on slips of paper. Then they had them drop the slips into boxes based on how comfortable they would be sharing that information.

(Almost) Everybody Loves Facebook

This week’s not surprising fact is that 52.2% of internet users log in to Facebook at least once a month. eMarketer says that number will climb to 62% by 2013 and after that, Facebook will simply take over the entire internet and we will all be made slaves to the “like” button.

Okay, that last part is mine, but eMarketer is an expert at predicting things and if they say that 152 million people will be logging on to Facebook by 2013, I believe them. Here’s a chart: