The FTC Rallies Against Fake News Ads

If you spend anytime following the news on the web you’ve seen the ads. They look like newspaper articles and many even feature the logos of CNN, USAToday and. . . oh, look. . there’s one right there!

Even though they do say “advertorial” on them and they are found in sidebars where banner ads usually hang out, people still think they’re legitimate news sources, so they click and they buy the diet product that is hawked at the end of it all. The FTC says no more. They’ve gone to court to stop ten companies who produce these phony ads and they want to force them refund the money to consumers who fell for the claims.

The FTC charges that the defendants:

Traffic From Social Media Has Highest Bounce Rate

Now that we have a lot more data in the hopper, it’s beginning to look like social media isn’t the magic pill many people thought it would be when it comes to marketing.

Today, we have numbers from Outbrain. This is the company that makes the “You Also Might Like” widget that suggests related content at the bottom of a blog post. They examined traffic from 100 million sessions across more than 100 premium publishers in order to find out how people are discovering content and what happens when they get there.

As we’ve seen from other surveys, the majority of traffic comes from search engines (41%) and content sites (31%). They say social media sends 11% of the traffic, which is better than the 1% ForeSee suggested, but it’s still not fabulous.

Facebook Send Button: Because Sometimes It’s Personal

Facebook has just released a new button that allows users to share items with select people as opposed to everyone who follows them.

The new Send button pops up a small email blank with a drop-down address bar that automatically suggests folks you’ve recently communicated with on Facebook. You can override this by typing in a name, an email address or a Facebook group name.

This is actually a very nice feature. I often see things that I’d like to forward to a select group and not everyone who follows me. The downside is, it doesn’t work with Lists, only Groups. For example, I saw a great daily deal today that I would have shared with my mommy blogging friends, but in order to reach all the people on my “mommy blogger” list, I had to select them one by one. Not good.

Celebrity Apprentice and Getting Back to Basics

Last night on Celebrity Apprentice, the teams were tasked with creating a four-page ad for the Trump Collection of Hotels. Now, before you scoff, let me tell you that you can learn a lot about marketing from this show, so read on and hold your laughter.

The judges felt that both teams failed miserably at the job, but what’s interesting is that they failed because they over-thought the task and forgot about the basics.

For example:

Stale Images

The executives on the task told the teams that they didn’t want those same old, typical hotel images, gleaming buildings and a waiter with a towel over his arm. And yet, that’s exactly what the teams gave them. The women even went so far as to put the Playmate on their team in a tub full of rose petals while she sipped champagne. Ah, luxury . . . that we’ve seen a thousand times before. The execs even went so far as to say the ad looked like the ones you see for a low-rent strip club. Yikes.

New Study: Half Life of a Facebook Post

When you make a post on your company’s Facebook page, you’ve got about an hour and 20 minutes before the post is out of sight and out of mind.

This factoid and a few other interesting gems, comes from a study done by social media toolbar provider, Visibli.

Their study indicated that Facebook posts get 50% of their likes in that first hour and twenty. A day later, the post is off the grid and forgotten but it still beats engagement on Twitter which has an even shorter window.

AdAge quoted Visibli CEO Saif Ajani as saying,

“If you want to maximize your exposure, you should post every hour and 20 minutes.”

On the other hand,

Get Bing Rewards Without a Bing Bar

Did you know that Bing has a rewards program? I didn’t and I belong to dozens of these things. Before now, though, I wouldn’t have bothered with Bing’s because you had to download a toolbar, but not anymore.

The Bing Rewards Preview is a program that let’s you earn credits when you visit the Bing homepage and there’s nothing to download. It uses your Windows Live ID to keep track, then it offers you point deals in a drop down box at the top of the page.

I was very surprised by the actions required in the first two credit offers that I received. The first asked me to read a page about polio and the second to check out a visual search page of Pulitzer Prize winning books.

Two Thirds of Deal Buyers Return For More

Nearly two-thirds (64.6 percent) of daily deal buyers returned later to patronize the businesses where they used a daily deal and 60 percent spent more than the deal value while they were there the first time.

How do you like them apples? We knew there had to be a reason deal sites kept popping up. They actually work! They actually bring in business. Who knew?

These new survey results come from Lightspeed and they were based on answers given by the 3,300 respondents who are members of Lightspeed Research’s U.S. online panel.

Take a look at this:

Those are some nice numbers there. And the fact that the users were on the fence tells me that they hadn’t used the service or bought the product before, so that 60% is likely all new customers.