Majority of seniors say advertisers don’t treat them with respect

Beatrices wallEarlier this year, Esurance ran a TV commercial where a senior citizen tried to prove how up-to-date she was by posting her vacation photos on her “wall”. But of course, it wasn’t her Facebook wall, it was the wall in her living room. When her friends try to top her with talk about fast insurance quotes, the woman “unfriends” them. Which. . . of course. . . is not how that works. Very funny.

Not really.

This is why 60% of the seniors in a GlynnDevins survey agreed that boomers in advertising are stereotypes. Slightly more than half said they don’t feel like they get respect from advertiser and only one third said they can relate to the seniors they see in commercials. They were particularly hard on pharmaceutical and financial ads. They said that companies have a tendency to go too far in either direction – too good to be true and too bad to be true. The attractive, wealthy, jet-setting seniors were just as off-putting as the feeble, confused seniors.

Instagram rolls out real-time analytics for advertisers

Instagram Ben and JerrysInstagram just took a giant leap into the display advertising pool with the release of several new analytic tools for brands. (Did you hear the splash?)

Almost a year ago, they barely dipped their toe into the water with a blog post that was so tentative it was almost comical.

In the next couple months, you may begin seeing an occasional ad in your Instagram feed if you’re in the United States. Seeing photos and videos from brands you don’t follow will be new, so we’ll start slow.

Advertising backlash is pretty much a given these days but it doesn’t have the punch it used to have. We’re all addicted to our social media choices. Did millions of people abandon Facebook when ads started showing up in the feed? Did they leave Twitter? And they won’t leave Instagram. . . . maybe.

Ode to a Search Engine: A look at Google’s 10 biggest search milestones

Google, how do I love thee? Let me count the ways. I love you for your intuition and how you know what I’m thinking when even I’m not so sure. I love you for your image search that helps me find a name for the thing I just bought at the thrift shop.  I love you for your inventive and amusing Google Doodles. (Doctor Who returns on Saturday!)

google doodle dr who
But mostly, I love the way you serve my content to millions of people on a daily basis absolutely free of charge.

Mobile purchases are up but revenue is down. How did that happen?

yesmail mobile vs desktopYesmail has good news and bad news for email marketers.

First, the good news.  “The number of purchases made as a result of emails opened on a mobile device has grown almost 40 percent over the past year.”

Now the bad news. “Revenue from mobile purchases increased by a comparatively modest 10 percent.”

No big deal, right? Because people who open email on a desktop clearly love to click through and spend. True enough, but Yesmail says that 64.5% of all email opens happen on a mobile device. And since the average order on a mobile device is 33% lower than the average order on a desktop ($55 vs $83) that’s a lot of money missing from the cash register.

Here’s the most honest back-to-school infographic you’re ever going to see

ShoeBuy Back to School 1My back-to-school shopping days are over but it all came back to me when I visited Staples last week. I was there for printer ink but I couldn’t resist the four foot stack of 17 cent spiral notebooks and the racks of Disney character folders and the bins of colorful school tools. I didn’t need any of it but I want it. . . all of it. . . it’s a crazy emotional trigger made worse possibly by the fact that I was a teacher for 10 years.

Then I heard a conversation that reminded me of the real meaning of back-to-school.

“Mom! I NEED this one!”

“That one is too expensive. Get the other one.”

“That one doesn’t have Transformers on it! And Mrs. Shipley says I need 8 notebooks.”

For top internet retailers 21% of sales come from mobile

Mobile 500 FactsHow does $83.78 billion in revenue sound to you? That’s what the top 500 leading retailers are expecting to see in mobile commerce by the end of the year. That’s 79.9% growth over last year and 21% of total online sales for those sellers.

The numbers come from the newly released “Internet Retailer 2015 Mobile 500” report.

Who is number one on the Top 500 list? Amazon, of course and they’re not stopping until everyone on the planet has shopped their site. Their 2014 mobile sales project falls just short of $17 billion.

Paul Cousineau, director of mobile shopping at Amazon.com says;

Millennials are changing the way we shop for cars

Thinking about buying a new car? A generation ago, you would have influenced by a TV commercial, then you’d spread out the newspaper to help you hone in on the right car at the right price. Final step – it’s off to the local dealership to buy the car of your dreams.

That last step is still the same, but a new survey from AutoTrader says that the new generation – the Millennials – have abandoned TV ads and newspapers in favor of the internet.

AutoTrader Infographic

What’s really interesting is that 70% of Millennials begin the car shopping process without a clue as to what make or style of car they want. They go online and start the process and spend an average of 17.6 hours “shopping”. That’s two hours longer than the average car buyer.