Amazon Local opens to reviews, could be first step to larger local marketplace

IMG_0394Amazon Local is a daily deal site like Groupon but there’s a rumor going around that it’s about to expand into a much more comprehensive service. There’s talk of an Amazon Local Marketplace where you can find a babysitter for your child, a doctor for your dog or vice versa.

Such a service would put Amazon in competition with Angie’s List and Yelp and Forbes says that just talk of Amazon getting into that end of the business caused stock prices for both companies to drop.

Amazon has been experimenting with same-day grocery deliveries for awhile. Earlier this week, I received an email saying that the service was now available in my area  – for a measly $299 a year! I’m sure there’s an audience that wouldn’t blink at that price, especially in Los Angeles. I’m not a part of that audience but if I was a busy executive living in a condo in the city, having someone deliver my groceries for that price would be a nice perk.

Facebook gives users the tools to remove ads based on topic

FB Ad ChoicesFacebook is about to launch a new ad preferences tool that will allow users to block ads by excluding specific topics. They say this will makes ads “better” because the viewer will have control over what they see and what they don’t. They say they’re making this option available because “soon” they won’t just be monitoring what you do on Facebook, they’ll also be including data from “some of the websites and apps you use.”

In case you didn’t know that your movements on the web turn into marketing fodder, Facebook has a detailed explanation of how this works:

I will follow you. . . Twitter launches website tracking tags

We’re all familiar with those ads that follow us around the internet, reminding us of where we’ve been. Now those ads can follow you to Twitter, too!

The secret is in the ultra new, Twitter website tag that matches your recent visitors to Twitter handles.

Twitter Website RemarketingIf you already have a Twitter tag for conversion tracking on your website, you’re good to go. If not, you can create a new snippet in the Twitter Ads UI. While you’re there, build an audience for remarketing then wait for the Twitter users to visit your page. In the example, a surfer dude checks out the new boards at the SoCal Surf Company! (Hey, that’s my neighborhood!) He’s not sure if he’s ready to buy so he leaves the website without making a purchase.  ;(

Pinterest expands search box, adds guided search to the web

With every passing upgrade, Pinterest is becoming more like a visual search engine and less like a social media network. A few months ago, they launched “guided search” on mobile and now that same feature is coming to the web. Kinda bass-ackwords if you ask me but they didn’t. . . .

On the web, guided search looks like this. It’s a series of filters designed to help you narrow down the choices when you’re looking for something specific.

New search on Pinterest

In the sample case, it’s about the difference between bbq (the thing you cook on outside) and bbq (the yummy food you like to eat).

The perils of mixing personal and professional on social media

ohSgCM0_stariSob_rgbstockIf I checked out your social media accounts today, what would I find? Personal updates? Professional updates? A mix of the two? Is there even a dividing line between your personal life and professional life? If you are your business that line doesn’t even exist. I struggle with this concept daily as I try to promote my writing through social media while still keeping up with friends, all while not alienating either one.

Wharton management professor Nancy Rothbard wrote a paper on the subject called, “When Worlds Collide in Cyberspace: How Boundary Work in Online Social Networks Impacts Professional Relationships.” Long title, but interesting food for thought. We’ve seen a number of high-profile CEOs and celebs take a beating over a personal photo or statement posted on social media but there are also plenty of cases of everyday people taking a hit for what seemed like an innocuous posting.

Average LinkedIn pro spends 8 hours consuming work-related content

LinkedIn consumptionLinkedIn surveyed 2,700 members and asked them questions about content consumption. What they discovered is that on average, their members spend 1 full workday (or more accurately, 8 hours over the course of a week) consuming professionally relevant content.

As a percentage of all the content they consume, 41% is work-related, 30% is news and only 29% is entertainment based. What’s even more interesting is that 65% said they were consuming more professional content than ever before.

If you’re in the business-to-business business, are you posting content on LinkedIn? I think it’s one of the most underused social networking platforms so you might be missing out.

If you haven’t tried it yet, here are a few points to think about:

Linkedin key needs

Millennials check their smartphones 43 times per day and other interesting facts

Millennials SDLSDL’s third report of the “Five Truths for Future Marketers” series is titled “Content Finds the Customer.” After reviewing the data, I think the title should be flipped to “Customers Find the Content.”

Think about it. Before mobile and even when the internet was new, customers were passive and advertisers pushed content in their direction. They sat in front of the TV and saw the commercials that were delivered. They opened the mail and found the store circulars and coupons. They opened the newspaper and saw the local ads.

Now, customers are in control of the feed. They skip the commercials on TV only watching the ones they want. They skip TV altogether in favor of streaming services and videos on YouTube. Mail can be stopped and is regularly tossed without a second look and how many millennials are reading the newspaper? Instead, they’re online, actively looking for the information they want and their expectations are higher than ever.