Google Demotes Chrome Browser in Search Results After “Unintentional” Paid Link Campaign

This post comes from our Search News Channel sponsor WebiMax.

It appears Google does, in fact, hold themselves accountable (to some degree) for their own policies and guidelines. News broke late on Monday by Aaron Wall (an internet marketer who founded SeoBook.com), when his community discovered a “This post is sponsored by Google” sponsored post.

Search marketers know very well that Google has a strict stance against paid links and states in their guidelines that “some SEOs and webmasters engage in the practice of buying and selling links that pass PageRank, disregarding the quality of the links”, noting that “buying and selling links that pass PageRank is in violation of Google’s Webmaster Guidelines and can negatively impact a site’s ranking in search results.”

Google’s official statement was:

Is Social Media More Than Just a Megaphone for Unhappy Customers?

This is part 3 of a series of posts from Chris Lorence, the CMO of the Independent Community Bankers of America. Chris is working to get a very traditional group to “buy in” to social media and we are letting you in on the process he is going through. His first post introduced us to the battle he faced just getting his members’ attention. His second post, was about helping his members simply see the social media light. Today, we see how Chris helps the uninitiated see what can be done to take the pain out of social media criticism.

This series is part of our ongoing effort here at Marketing Pilgrim to show the real world of social media rather than just the industry hype and drivel. Let us know what you think and give us an idea of what you might like to see in the future.

Social Media: 4 Simple Principles To Convert the Harshest Critics

This is part 2 of a series of posts from Chris Lorence, the CMO of the Independent Community Bankers of America. Chris is working to get a very traditional group to “buy in” to social media and we are letting you in on the process he is going through. His first post introduced us to the battle he faced just getting his members’ attention. Today we see how Chris helps the uninitiated see the social media light.

This series is part of our ongoing effort here at Marketing Pilgrim to show the real world of social media rather than just the industry hype and drivel. Let us know what you think or even what you would like to see in the future.

Internet Summit 2011: Engagement and Data Rule the Day

Tackling the social marketing landscape can be quite challenging. With it’s continuous growth and evolving technologies, it’s a battle to stay a step ahead while remaining relevant to your customers. For the nearly 2,000 internet executives, senior marketers, digital professionals, entrepreneurs and investors attending the recent Internet Summit 2011 in Raleigh, NC (November 15 -16) this challenge became a little more achievable.

Being a first time attendee to the conference, I walked in with no preconceived notions just an open mind, an active Twitter account and a laptop ready for note taking. I wanted to capture a few new marketing tactics that could be applied to my active email marketing and social media initiatives. What I walked away with proved to be much more meaningful – fresh knowledge and practical applications.

The Secrets to Successful Multilingual Social Media

Love it or hate it, social media has changed the way we interact, advertise and engage with our target markets. Even the chances that you made it to this article through social media are high – a recent study found almost 9 in 10 businesses use social media for marketing purposes.

And why not? It’s free, it’s effective and you can reach people all over the world in a few simple clicks.

But to truly reach global markets, you need to speak their language, and there are a few essential tricks you need to know to make it in the heady world of multilingual social media.

Google+: It’s A Matter of Trust

This post was written prior to yesterday’s announcement regarding Google+ being open to everyone. Whether this changes Mike’s outlook remains to be seen :-).

I was in Denmark (among other places) the last couple of weeks and I had a chance to sit down with an old friend from IBM, who once wrote a comment on one of my blog posts that reminded me of something that I sometimes forget. Trust is relative. Trusting someone to answer a question isn’t the same as trusting him to watch your two-year-old. In marketing, we talk a lot about gaining customer trust, but it isn’t a blanket thing. For some purchases (buying a car), we need a lot of trust and for others (buying a coffee), not so much.

Top Ten Takeaways From the Inbound Marketing Summit

The best marketing conferences combine education, inspiration and entertainment with plenty of face time and networking. At the recent Inbound Marketing Summit 2011, the consensus of the nearly 800 attendees scored it highly on all counts.

Drawn from conversations with fellow attendees, plus a few days to mull over the flood of ideas, this list of the Top 10 takeaways reflects the mix of strategic concepts and actionable ideas featured at the summit.

1. Jump off the competitive treadmill – If your company disappeared today, would your customers truly be lost, or could they just switch? Harvard Business School’s Youngme Moon explored how being meaningfully different cultivates irreplaceability and brand loyalty. To get there, we need to go beyond analyzing competitors and markets, blaze new paths and take risks. This is a scary proposition – but it’s a vital factor in some of the biggest successes in business.