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Content Wars: eBooks Falter But New York Times Paywall is a Hit

Have you ever read Thunderstruck by Erik Larson? Published in 2006, it’s the true story of how Marconi’s wireless helped capture one of England’s most notorious killers. I went to buy a copy from Amazon last week and here’s what I found:

thunderstruck

I could have the ebook delivered instantly to my Kindle for $11.99. If I was willing to buy it used (I was) and wait several weeks for delivery, I could buy it for one cent. I’d have to pay shipping, but with media rates it would still come in under $4.00. $8.00 more to get it now or save the money and get a copy that I can later turn in for credit at the local used book store.

Save to Drive Chrome Extension and Image Enhancements from Google

Save to Drive Chrome ExtensionGoogle is busy putting together more and more pieces of rather widespread and increasingly comprehensive set of productivity tools that one day might, just might, make people use all of them and see their interconnectedness (Did I channel my inner Buddhist? Nope. I didn’t think so either).

Among the latest additions are a Chrome extension that helps you save images to your Google Drive account. The other is a way to use the images once they are in Drive.

First the extension which is called Save to Drive (clever). From the Google Drive blog we get this

The new Save to Drive Chrome extension gives you a few new ways to capture content from anywhere on the web and store it neatly in Drive. After you install the extension, you can click on the Drive extension icon to save:

New Study Looks at How Mobile Fits Into Daily News Consumption

Recently, News Corp announced that they were pulling the plug on their subscription based, mobile only newspaper The Daily. It was a grand attempt to get readers to pay for quality content but it fell far short of expectations. Did News Corp do something wrong, or is it the concept as a whole that is at fault?

Mojiva has some data that could help answer that question. They’re a mobile ad network site that reaches 1.1 billion mobile devices around the world. They just published a new report covering the US and the UK titled “The State of Mobile News Consumption“.  Talk about spot on!

Amy Vale, VP, Global Research and Strategic Communications of Mojiva, Inc. begins with this:

News Corp Pulls the Virtual Plug on their iPad Newspaper

Falling just short of their two-year anniversary, News Corp is shutting down their iPad newspaper The Daily.

On the surface, this doesn’t sound like big news, but it’s a terrible blow for content producers. You see, The Daily was News Corp’s attempt to show that a digital / mobile was a viable substitute for the printed newspaper. With subscriptions and ad dollars falling, news publishers know they have to go virtual to remain in the game but it’s just not working — not in terms of ad sales or subscriptions.

In 22 months, The Daily acquired 100,000 paying subscribers. The prices varied slightly by device but in general we’re talking $19.99 a year for Kindle, $39.99 for iPad and other tablets. Initially, a lot of subscribers came on board for the novelty, drawn in by the promise of quality journalism in an interactive format.

Some Cross Channel Marketing Troubles Attributed to Staffing

Cross channel marketing is one of those subjects that is SO easy to throw around in a conversation about marketing but when you get down to the actual execution of the different facets of it things get a little less easy.

A recent study from ExactTarget and Forrester called “The Keys to Successful Cross Channel Marketing” gives us a look into the struggles that marketers encounter in trying to truly execute and measure the success of cross channel marketing efforts.

The study looked at marketers in companies of $100 million plus in revenue and it found that 78% of those surveyed feel cross channel efforts are important or very important to their business. Other major findings include

Poynter Study Shows How We Interact with Tablet Content

As a teen, I learned to speed read using a machine that brought each line of text up into my line of vision like a teleprompter, pushing me to consume each sentence at a glance. Once I had the skill, I transferred it to books by moving my eyes down the page instead of the page moving up to meet my eyes.

But now that I do the majority of my reading digitally, I’ve naturally graduated to a hybrid of the two which Poynter says is becoming the norm for tablet readers.

The Poynter Institute is training a new generation of journalist and that means looking at how our reading habits are changing to meet digital requirements. For their new study “Poynter EyeTrack: The Tablet,” they monitored two groups of people, 18-28 year-old “digital natives” and 45-55 year-olds “printnets.” (People who grew up with print but have moved on to the internet.)

Newsweek Goes All Digital While OCRegister Revitalizes Print

In 1984, Dr. (and Ghostbuster) Egon Spengler declared, “print is dead.” He was certainly on to something, but his conclusion was a bit premature.

Newsweek, the venerable weekly news magazine, has been publishing steadily since 1933. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents an issue or you could buy a full year subscription for $4.00. Inside the pages — solid news reporting and in-depth looks at people and issues you thought you knew. But it’s the covers that made Newsweek famous, from their undoctored OJ mugshot to Obama with a rainbow halo.

Well, the reporting will live on but the mag’s cover days are almost over. At the end of this year, Newsweek as a print magazine will cease to exist. After that, it’s all digital. You’ll still have to pay for a subscription but the issues will arrive in your iPad instead of your mailbox.