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Study Shows the Old Fashioned Print Catalog is Good for Internet Sales

1962-sears-christmas-bookWhen I was little, my sisters and I nearly burst with excitement when the Sears Christmas Wish Book landed on our doorstep. We’d sit together on the couch and slowly go through it page by page (even the boring pages because the anticipation was part of the fun), working our way back to the toy section. We’d play “pick,” choosing our favorite item on each page as if we were creating the world’s biggest wish list.

I wonder if today’s kids feel that way about the Toys R Us catalog that shows up in the Sunday newspaper?

The excitement level may not be the same but a study by global management consulting firm Kurt Salmon shows that print catalogs actually help boost online sales.

Facebook vs. Twitter: Which One Rules for Mobile Marketing?

Facebook has a lot of users and that equals a huge pool of potential customers – aka reach, but it’s not always the advertising juggernaut you’d expect it to be given its popularity.

Larry Kim, the wise man of Wordstream turned his magnifying glass on the social media giant and whipped up a few charts comparing Facebook to its biggest (little) competitor, Twitter! What he discovered was. . . . (did you really think I was going to spoil the ending? Read on.)

Comparing advertising on Facebook and Twitter is a little like comparing apples to coconuts but Larry did it anyway. (Check his blog post for where he got his numbers.)

twitter-vs-facebook-ad-performance-metrics

The Lowly Promotional T-Shirt Gets a Philanthropic Lift

t-shirtThe T-shirt. It’s a basic staple that went from practical undergarment to fashion statement in under fifty years. We tie-dye them, rip them, fill them with glitter and studs. We mass produce them with funny images and hand paint them like works of art. You can buy one for $3 at Walmart or fork over several thousand dollars for a simple, plain, couture shirt.

But dig around in their closets and you’ll find that 44% of Americans own a promotional shirt that they probably didn’t even pay for. And why should they? Promo shirts turn the wearer into a walking billboard and now, those simple tops have a loftier goal – they’re raising money for charity.

Bing Launches Linked-Offers: Use Your Credit Card, Get a Deal

The downside to most coupons is that you have to have them to use them. Logical, I know, but at least a few times a month I end up at a store or restaurant when the coupon for the establishment is at home on my desk. It makes me crazy but Bing is here to help.

Bing is currently testing a new program called Card-Linked offers in Seattle, Washington. The consumer signs up for the program, lists their credit card and debit card numbers, then a deal is automatically applied when they meet the discount conditions.

bing offers linked cardsHere’s a deal for 10% off a meal at Blue Ginger Korean Grill & Sushi in Bellevue. To get this deal, you only have to show up at the restaurant, eat, then pay with your linked card.

New Nielsen Findings: If You Love a TV Show, You’re More Likely to Remember the Ads

arrow_novsweepsposter_600Nielsen did a spectacular thing: they cataloged 70,000 TV ads on 6,777 TV shows over a three year period then figured out the correlation between the viewers interest in the show and their recall of the ad.

They divided this by that, accounted for X and filled in the Y and came to this conclusion:

For every 2 percentage point improvement in a viewer’s program engagement—how well people remember what happened in a TV show they watched the prior evening—advertisers can (on average) expect a 1 percentage point improvement in sustained ad memorability.

In other words – the more a person likes a show, the more they’ll remember the commercials that ran during the show.

During the Day, Facebook Reaches More People Than Network TV

Daytime TV has changed. For years, soaps ruled the airwaves but now you’ll find more people talking about their real problems than acting out fictional ones. The networks think they have the mix right, but according to Nielsen more folks are tuning into Facebook than to daytime TV.

nielsen facebook day reach

Look at those blue lines go. It’s not even a contest in the 18-34 bracket. We start to see a switch around 45 and TV wins in the over 65 group. Maybe that’s why daytime TV is full of commercials for pharmaceuticals and life insurance. If you’re selling fast cars and trendy clothes put your effort into posting to your Facebook brand page from ten until three everyday.

Once primetime kicks in, it’s a different story.

nielsen facebook primetime reach

New Mobile App Helps Consumers Get a Break from Commercials

1We’re a nation that wants everything for nothing. We fight against Sponsored posts on Facebook. Video ads on YouTube and networks that track us to deliver relevant banners while we surf. But there’s one ad type that has created more controversy than all of those put together — the TV commercial.

I’m not sure when it happened, but somewhere in broadcast history, we the people began rallying against these mini-adventures that interrupt our favorite shows. It probably happened when networks started ramping up the number of commercial minutes per hour. Back in 2009, TNS Media estimated that commercial messages take up 36% of a prime-time, hour-long show. Wow.

If you’re one of those people that would rather surf the channels rather than watch another artsy ad for a new car, Aristarchos LTD has an app for you. It’s called Commercial Break and it’s new for iOS (Android coming soon.)