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Is Do Not Track Something to Worry About?

This past Wednesday, the FTC released a report stating that they were behind a “Do Not Track” program that would automatically stop all ad tracking unless the consumer opted in. The consensus from the government is that advertisers aren’t doing enough to assure consumer privacy, so they’re being forced to step in.

As of this morning, a dozen plus blogs and news outlets have chimed in on the topic discussing everything from the possibility of it becoming a reality and who will be hurt if it happens.

Multichannel news covered a Time Warner media VP’s appearance before the subcommittee on Thursday. Joan Gillman’s point was that “Do Not Track” would interfere with the “vibrancy” of the internet in that it would restrict a company’s ability to be marketing innovators.

Super Bowl Ads and the Evolution of Online Marketing

Do you remember Pets.com? Back in 2000, the internet company made a big splash with a clever Super Bowl ad that had pet owners rushing to the site to buy dog food. Actually, not the second part. Like a lot of companies during the dot.com boom, the Super Bowl ad was the first and final hurrah for Pets.com.

While you won’t see the return of the dot.com dandies this Super Bowl, Advertising Age is predicting a big run on ads that are digitally and socially enhanced. Go read the article. I’ll wait.

(Insert “The Girl from Ipanema” here.)

Back? Great. Pete Blackshaw makes a reference to a POEM framework: paid media, owned media and earned media. It’s his contention, and I totally agree, that the successful brands will find a way to balance the golden POEM triangle in order to get the very most out of every ad dollar.

Competitor Gone Out of Business: Their Loss is Your Gain?

Mike Michalowicz, has an article in the small business section of today’s Wall Street Journal that talks about ways of siphoning off the clients from a competitor who has gone out of business. The concept is based on the idea that the world is full of ads that lead to dead phone numbers or defunct websites. It happens because companies don’t anticipate going out of business when they buy that phone book ad or drop 10,000 postcards with their web address from a hot air balloon. So Michalowicz says you should claim old phone numbers and web addresses and redirect them to your own active business.

Eloqua Report Offers Tips on Lead Generation & Email Marketing

Marketing automation has made it possible for a small sales staff to contact and monitor 1,000 of customers with just a few key strokes, but such ease of use has its downside. Just because you can send out mass mailings, doesn’t mean you should. 1,000 randomly targeted emails might bring in a couple of dollars, but Eloqua, a provider of marketing automation solutions says that proper lead scoring and nurturing are more likely to pay off in the long run.

As part of their Eloqua Experience user conference, Eloqua collected data from more than 700 B2B and B2C companies to come up with their new report: How Do You Stack Up? Marketing Automation Trends, Benchmarks, & Best Practices.

Video Aids Double-Digit Growth in Online Ad Spending

The Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) is reporting record breaking numbers on ad spending, but don’t put the down-payment on the Ferrari just yet. While it’s clear that the first half of 2010 saw a hefty increase in online ad dollars, the 11.3% increase is over the first half of 2009 which was an exceptionally bad moment in time.

Display advertising pulled in $4.4 billion in the first half of 2010 which is a 16% increase over the same period in 2009. Much of the growth came in the area of digital video advertising which is as high as it’s ever been, a full 31% over last year. This increase points to two things – consumers are responding to video advertising and ad buyers are more comfortable with the medium. Still, I’d say it’s the buyers not the consumers that are keeping video advertising from going through the roof.

AdKeeper Lets You Rip Out Ads the Modern Way

I’m a magazine ripper. I admit it and I know it’s not something everyone understands, but it’s how I roll. As I read my favorite magazines, I rip out recipes, coupons, the occasional photo of a good looking guy (hey, all work and no play. . . ) and I rip out ads.

With the holidays coming, I’ve been ripping more ads than ever so I was very intrigued when I saw the recent ClickZ article on AdKeeper. AdKeeper is an online service that allows you to virtually rip out the ads you see online. Scott Kurnit, founder and former CEO of About.com, is the man behind the plan. He commissioned a study and found that 95% of people tear ads out of magazines, so it appears I’m not alone in this. His logic is anytime you can bring an offline behavior online, you’ve got a winner.

It’s Not Easy Being Green

Everyone knows green is good and I’m not just talking about the kind you stuff in your wallet. Green is a marketing buzzword that tells your customers that you’re hip, you’re concerned and you’re doing something about it.

Now before you start typing “eco-friendly” on your weekly newsletter, you better take a look at the new guidelines proposed by the FTC.

The Federal Trade Commission is concerned that agencies aren’t taking this environmental stuff seriously so they’re cracking the whip.

FTC Chairman Jon Leibowitz had this to say:

“In recent years, businesses have increasingly used ‘green’ marketing to capture consumers’ attention. But what companies think green claims mean and what consumers really understand are sometimes two different things.”