Marketing Pilgrim's "Inbound Marketing" Channel

Marketing Pilgrim's Inbound Channel is sponsored by SDL. SDL Campaigns empowers marketers to create, deliver, monitor and measure dynamic, highly-targeted and personalized digital marketing campaigns across all channels and devices.

Are you fluent in the language your customers speak?

SDL_bn_Truth4_300x250The world is shrinking fast — not in terms of actual geography, of course, but in our capacity to communicate with one another in multiple ways, in real time, 24×7. Now that we can send messages across miles of land and sea in a mere heartbeat, the global marketplace is open to virtually every business, and everything can happen right now.

As marketers increasingly do business across borders, and across an ever-expanding range of channels, delivering a consistent, compelling customer experience is no small feat. What makes sense for one region or culture may not suit the next . . . and no, you can’t simply rely on Google Translate to make it all turn out alright.

Why not?

Content: focus on your customers, not volume

Find your customersFeed the beast. Tame the monster. Stop the roar. Why do marketers insist on characterizing their content consumers as unruly, insatiable animals?

I suppose it’s because that’s exactly the way many have learned to think of it. For years now, marketing organizations have been trying to create messaging that can fill what may seem like an infinite void. Just keep churning out the content, and somehow, someday, some way, it will all pay off in the end . . . right?

There is a better approach, and now that 90% of B2C marketers and marketers say they’ve thrown their hats in the content marketing ring, you need to start using a strategy that’s more efficient – and more effective. If you don’t, much of your effort will be wasted, because your customers are becoming increasingly distracted by the marketing messages – the content – bombarding them at virtually every turn.

‘Your Data Trumps Big Data’ – An infographic for optimizing marketing for Millennials

The Millennial generation is an opportunity and a challenge for businesses. In this second wave of research conducted by SDL we can see how the currency of data is treated with great value and respect by the Millennial generation but in equal measure, they are also willing to give up certain elements of data and personal information if there is something in it for them.

The notion of the fair exchange is nothing new in customer experience but the data presented below certainly highlights the need for authenticity and respect in building that all important bridge of trust between the consumer and businesses, as surveyed in Millennials.‘Your Data Trumps Big Data’ represents the need for a new approach by Marketers to obtaining and utilizing data for optimized customer experiences.

data_infographic1

When it comes to data, big is not always better

The key component of big dataDespite all the papers, presentations and personal conversations that have been devoted to it, most marketers I talk to still haven’t warmed up to “big data.”

That’s understandable.

According to IDG Enterprise, about one-third (31%) of companies will be managing more than one petabyte of data by the end of this year. (Note for non-Computer Science majors: One petabyte is equal to one million gigabytes.)

How can you possibly get your arms around a number that is so, well … “big?” And even if you do, won’t it be a hollow victory, since we all know even larger volumes – the exabyte, zettabyte, yottabyte, et al. – are just around the corner?

It’s no wonder marketers feel overwhelmed with big data . . . and it’s precisely why I propose a completely different approach.

Is that a Dodo bird…or a marketing campaign?

Dodo birdRemember how business professionals used to be completely devoted to the BlackBerry – so much so that “Crackberry” was named Word-of-the-Year in 2006? Back then, we didn’t realize that most of the technology we were holding near-and-dear would quickly become passé.

But now, we’re getting more accustomed to the rapid evolution of technology and processes. Looking around, I know that much of what’s familiar in the workplace today is probably on its way to becoming obsolete, replaced with alternatives that are more user-friendly, more intuitive and always connected.

And I know that’s exactly what’s happening with conventional marketing campaigns, too.

As I see it, one-way, mass-market marketing campaigns are going the way of dinosaurs and dodo birds. In the not-too-distant future, they’ll be extinct – not because there’s anything inherently “bad” about conventional marketing campaigns, but because they’re becoming less and less effective.

A Millennial by any other name would still smell as sweet to a brand

Millennials MatterBorn between the early 1980s and 2000? Remember Italia ‘90 or USA ‘94 as your first soccer World Cup? Born in a time when mobile phones replaced landlines as the phone of choice? Let alone could access the internet, or fit in the pocket of your jeans; and when Jurassic Park was about as advanced as cinema got? Well then you, dear reader, are a Millennial. But maybe you don’t identify with such a label? Perhaps you are familiar with ‘Generation Y’, the obvious follow-up to ‘Generation X.’ Or maybe in your country you are familiar with another bucket term.

Elevating customer experience: what every CMO needs to know

perfectionThe days of building your brand solely through carefully-crafted marketing campaigns are long gone, and in this brave new world, every Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) needs to move cultivating a stellar customer experience to the very top the to-do list.

What that means is that every channel, every touch point and every interaction must work in tandem so that ultimately you communicate one essential message: Our customers are what matters most.

Of course, the entire c-suite plays a role in this synchronicity, but as CMO, it’s your job to take the lead in defining your customer journey. You’re responsible for elevating the brand by strengthening relationship (both internal and external) fostering loyalty and encouraging advocacy. And in order to do all that, you need to fully recognize that consumers – and their expectations – have changed . . . dramatically. For example, today’s consumers are: