Marketing Pilgrim's "Infographics" Channel

Marketing Pilgrim's "Infographic" Channel is sponsored by Avalaunch Media. Avalaunch has created many of the most viewed infographics on the web and knows the intricacies of how to build a viral campaign. Avalaunch Media generates the idea, conducts the research, designs the infographic, and seeds the promotion in all the right places. Then, you sit back and watch your popularity take off. When you think Ideation, Research, Design and Promotion, think Avalaunch Media.

Viggle Jumps into the Holiday Stats Pool With a Cheery Infographic

My favorite social TV app, Viggle has decided to use their great power for the good of online marketers everywhere. They’ve put their vast, TV addicted audience to work on a survey about their holiday shopping intentions, then they packed the results into a jolly infographic just for you. . . and you. . . and you over there sucking on that candy cane.

The mad scientist in me will now dissect said infographic, for your edification and enjoyment.

We start with some good news:

That average spend isn’t too bad. Retailers would like to see more, of course, but $505 is a number most of us can live with.

Just How Big is Big Data?

Big data is a term you hear bandied about a lot these days, but what exactly does it mean?

Big data refers to any collection of information that is so large, you can’t use normal means to process it. For example, I can list all of the kids in the local elementary school on a spreadsheet then use conventional sort methods to find out how many are girls, how many are born in December, how many have siblings in the same school. Easy.

Now, suppose I want to mine that same information, but with all the kids in every elementary school in the US. That would require a very, very large spreadsheet and better tools for sorting and quantifying.

In online marketing, we’re looking a big data sets connected to internet usage. We begin with a simple slice from Monetate’s new Infographic “The Retailer’s Guide to Big Data.”

Then we add in other types of data collected by retailers on the internet. Names, addresses, birth dates, phone numbers, email. Then we move beyond personal identifiers into personal preferences; what did a person buy, how often did they buy, did they buy the blue one more often than the red one. From there we expand to product reviews, and Likes and Pins on Pinterest, shared links, photos and blog posts. Each of these items tells us something about the person who interacted with each of these experiences.

Who Supports Small Business? Survey Says Facebook, Not Etsy

There’s not usually a long line at the window where you leave compliments for Facebook, but in a recent survey by Manta, they did alright.

Manta asked 1,087 small business owners which online marketplaces offered them the most support. Facebook came out on top with 29% of the vote. Granted, that’s not a huge slice but the fact that anybody thought Facebook was supportive of small businesses is pretty amazing.

What’s more amazing is the site that landed on the bottom – Etsy. This site is made up entirely of artists, crafters and vintage dealers, many of which are one-man operations. But 47% of those surveyed said they thought the site was the least supportive of small business owners. Ouch.

You know who else landed on the bottom? eBay, Amazon and Groupon!

Republican Voters Spend More Online and Other Electoral Ecommerce Stats

While much of the world waits to see how voters in the red and blue states will respond once they hit the polls, Monetate has the answer to an even more important question — how much do they spend online?

Turns out that folks from the red states, the ones that traditionally vote Republican spend an average of $92.22 when they shop online beating the Democratic blue states ($91.62) and the Undecided purple states ($87.63).

This could have something to do with the fact that Romney supporters are also pro Mac. 24.31% of Republicans are using Apple computers compared to 17.63% of Obama supporters. Those guys are much more PC (so to speak).

Overwhelming Portion of Holiday Shoppers Will Start on One Device and Finish on Another

For several years now, we’ve been hearing about the impact of mobile on holiday shopping. But here’s a fact I’ve never heard before.

85% of shoppers will shop for a gift by starting on one device and finishing on another.

The information comes from the Adweek Google 2012 Digital Holidays survey and it’s all about the birth of the multi-screen holiday shopping season. Take a look at this slice from their delightful infographic:

Crazy stuff. And what’s funny is, I actually do these things but didn’t really think about it. I email myself from my iPad all the time. I did this just yesterday after I found a cool gift idea for my husband. Emailing is an inelegant solution to the problem but it works. A better solution is a direct connection between the tablet (or smartphone) and the computer. For example, I also used the Amazon app on my iPad to add items to my Wish List which my husband will later access from his computer.

SoLoMo Infograph Shows Impact of Mobile and Social on Locale

If you own a small, brick and mortar or service business, you need to know about SoLoMo. Don’t worry, it’s not illegal, it’s not even really a secret, it’s just a cool acronym that combines three of the hottest trends in marketing – SOcial, LOcal, and MObile.

Last week, Frank asked the question, “Is Doing Mobile a No-Brainer for Your Company?” Well, of course it is. Everyone has to have mobile. . . because . . . look!

Gotta have a piece of that, right? But check out this block from the new Monetate infograph titled “Retailer’s Guide to SoLoMo.”

Ouch. That’s a lot of thought for only a 1% conversion. Maybe mobile isn’t the yellow brick road after all. But wait, before you fire your developer, take a look at this;

[Infographic] A History of Social Media

Our friends over at Copyblogger have completed an ambitious undertaking and put together a history of social media for us all to enjoy and even possibly debate (imagine that these days, huh?).

The infographic starts WAY back in 1971 and winds its way through the early years of the social web and up to today’s latest entries that include Google+ and Pinterest.

What might this look like even just a year from now? Will something like Pheed make the cut? Will there be other entries? Will there be challengers to the Big Two of Facebook and Twitter?

Well, this isn’t about the future, it’s about the history so here you go.