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Yelp Sets Up Sting to ID and Label Businesses Who Manipulate Reviews

Yelp is certainly an Internet success story. Part of how we know just how successful it is involves the level of controversy that is often associated with the company directly or those who are looking to use the review site to their best business advantage.

The local business online review space is rife with abuses, allegations, misuses, and more and Yelp is a major player so may look to how they handle the more troubling aspects of the local review space as an industry standard or, often much more accurately, that lack thereof.

The most recent action taken by Yelp to help ‘clean up’ after those businesses that are trying to game the system comes in the form of a sting operation to catch businesses trying to buy reviews in the act then giving them the Yelp equivalent of a scarlet letter to make that point to Yelpers everywhere.

Is Doing Mobile a No-Brainer for Your Company?

We talk about mobile. We talk so much about it so much I wonder if we have moved to the ‘dangerous assumption’ phase of the game. That’s the point where it seems to be such a foregone conclusion that since everyone is talking about mobile then everyone is actually doing it and doing it well. If that isn’t a dangerous assumption in the Internet marketing world then I don’t know what is.

Research is showing clearly that users expect a reasonable mobile experience. If we are to believe a report done on Google’s behalf by SmithGeiger and Sterling Research (which was repackaged by eMarketer) then if we are not paying attention to mobile the risks can be quite high.

Google Looks to Further Differentiate Maps Offering With Street View Update

While the furor over Mapplegate has died down a bit it doesn’t mean that the battle of the online cartographers is over, not by a long shot.

In fact, it is fair to expect that Google and just about any other map player in the space will be attempting to roll out feature after feature to establish position in the all important online map space.

Google’s latest play comes complete with hyperbole and all. Their blog post from the Lat Long blog is titled “Making Google Maps more comprehensive with biggest Street View update ever” Woo hoo! Here’s what is it says and below that is a sample of what one can expect.

Today we’re making our Street View coverage more comprehensive than ever before by launching our biggest ever update–doubling our number of special collections and updating over 250,000 miles of roads around the world. We’re increasing Street View coverage in Macau, Singapore, Sweden, the U.S., Thailand, Taiwan, Italy, Great Britain, Denmark, Norway and Canada. And we’re launching special collections in South Africa, Japan, Spain, France, Brazil and Mexico, among others.

The courtyard of Kronborg castle, Denmark

Online Map Battle Continues as Both Sides Sound Off

As you probably already know, Apple CEO Tim Cook has issued his mea culpa for the Apple Maps ‘problem’. No matter which side of this argument you are on this has elicited some interesting responses.

First we hear from the pro-Apple, ‘Yeah Tim Cook rocks!” camp headed by camp counselor, Farhad Manjoo of Pando Daily. He cuts to the chase saying that this is over in one masterful swipe from the head Apple and that even Google has stubbed its toe here.

Google’s ‘Field Trip’ App for Android Adds to Local Offering

It appears that for the past several months the folks at Google have been hard at work preparing for the Apple Maps launch.

They were hard at work because they knew they had a potentially formidable opponent and that even related services to local and location based offerings needed to be strong to face this foe. Of course, even in their wildest dreams could they have imagined the apparent train wreck that is Apple Maps and the Apple local experience in general.

So now all that hard work has paid off handsomely. The latest local offering which is for Android only is an app called Field Trip which allows you to get information about things based on your location. The Verge reports

Google has just launched Field Trip, a new app that the company says is “your guide to the cool, hidden, and unique things in the world around you.” It sounds like it works as a virtual tour guide — with the app running in the background, a “card” will pop up with information any time you’re near a site of interest.

Here’s one of the usual heart-strings-tugging videos from Google to promote the app.

Apple’s Response to Map Flap: Just Use It and It Will Get Better

This is weird. Usually we don’t have to write about or read about a major Apple screw-up. It’s just not how things happen in the world of Apple. Maybe it’s a post-Steve Jobs era sign or maybe it’s just the case of discovering that Apple, the company, is inhabited by humans rather than perfect product producing cyborgs.

Whatever the reason though the Apple Maps dust-up has been a major black eye for the usually near flawless company. Bad directions, terrible images and generally bad information have made Apple Maps a bit of a laughingstock in just a few short days.

Apple’s response? As reported by All Things D Apple spokesperson Trudy Muller offered this

Brits Say Apple Maps Not Their Cup of Tea

One of the biggest question marks surrounding the release of the iPhone 5 and iOS 6 was the removal of Google Maps as the backend of the native Maps app for Apple and its replacement with Apple’s own homegrown or ‘mashed up’ version of maps.

Would it be as good as Google Maps? Would it be better? Or, dear lord please no, would it be worse?

Well, if this article from the BBC is any indication, the early results are less than favourable (or favorable depending on which side of the Atlantic you are reading this from).

Inaccuracies and misplaced towns and cities in Apple’s new map software have provoked anger from users.

In June Apple announced it would stop using Google Maps in favour of its own system, created using data from navigation specialist TomTom.