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Got Glass? Google gets beta testers to pay handsomely for the experience

I am so bummed. I really, really wanted one of these sky blue Google Glass units but they’re sold out!

Google GlassPlus, I didn’t have $1,500 to spend on one but Google’s making it seem like I’m alone in that. Yesterday, Google Glass units (Or is it a pair of Google Glass-es?) went on sale to public for the first time. By noon, they had sold out of the Cotton (aka white) units. By 9:30 pm, they were sold out in every color. . . I think. Because Google’s not being really clear about the numbers.

First of all, they referred to the whole process as the path to joining the “Explorer Program.” Any other company would call it what it is – beta testing.

It’s the year of mobile but not the mobile ad

How often use a smartphoneA mobile device used to be a luxury, an item that only the geeky few would own let alone use on a daily basis. But now you’re the odd man out if you don’t have a mobile phone in your pocket. Check out these stats from Forrester Research:

  • More than 2 billion smartphones installed worldwide
  • They’re in the hands of 31.3% of the world’s population
  • Massive usage in three countries: More than 64% in the UK, 64% in the US, and 66% in Hong Kong.
  • Three-quarters use their smartphone to access the internet at least once a day.

This is great news for marketers, right? Well, it would be if we weren’t going backward through the history of online marketing.

Read this before handing Google $1500 for Google Glass today

Google GlassToday is the day that Google allows anyone to purchase its wearable Google Glass tech. Based on the price tag and low specs (pardon the pun) I expect literally dozens of you to stampede the Google servers.

If you do plan to hand over $1500 for something that could lead to ridicule–and even a mugging–Reuters published a piece that has absolutely nothing to do with Google Glass, yet everything to do with Google Glass.

Google’s updated terms of service added a paragraph stating that “our automated systems analyze your content (including emails) to provide you personally relevant product features, such as customized search results, tailored advertising, and spam and malware detection. This analysis occurs as the content is sent, received, and when it is stored.

New study shows boomers are riding the local-mobile train, too

We know that Gen Y and Gen X rarely leave the house without their mobile phones. It’s a tool they grew up with and can’t remember living without. On the other end of the seesaw are the baby boomers who remember the days when you had to drop a dime in a payphone to make a call from a public place. Can’t find the store you’re looking for? That same phone booth has a handy dandy telephone book on a chain that you can use to look it up. How archaic!

But a new survey conducted by Thrive Analytics and released today by the Local Search Association, shows that now older generations are climbing on board the local-mobile train, too.

Local Search Boomer Survey

The Digital Advertising Alliance releases new guidelines for mobile icon use

Digital Ad IconIf you’re collecting data through any kind of mobile advertising, The Digital Advertising Alliance (DAA) would like you to abide by a set of new rules. Okay, not new exactly – more like tightened up rules for the sake of consistency.

The newly released “Ad Marker Implementation Guidelines for Mobile” explains exactly when and where you should use the symbol you see here.

The Ad Marker Guidelines define minimum dimensions for the icon on mobile screens, as well as establishing dimensions for the touch area that should activate the icon. When users touch the icon on a mobile screen, the Guidelines also set forth what information and options may be displayed. This practical guidance, formed with input from a wide variety of companies and organizations, was created to present a consistent privacy experience to consumers.

Twitter plans Android lockscreen maneuver with Cover app acquisition

Last month, Facebook surprised me when they bought Oculus, a company specializing in virtual reality gaming gear.

Today, Twitter played a card from their hand when they acquired “Cover” – an Android lockscreen app. Cover App

The difference between the two acquisitions? Twitter’s makes sense.

Cover puts the links to your most used Android phone apps right on your lockscreen for easy access. What makes this app really special is that the icons change based on the time of day. In other words, the app learns from your behavior then adjusts itself accordingly.

Morning commute? Cover hands you map and music. At work? Your calendar and To Do list show up instead. Evening? Shopping apps and Netflix. It’s the right app for the right time and place.

Freemium app biz flourishes while paid apps take a dive

appsAt least once I week I think about building an app. With the wide range of options and explosive growth, it reminds me of the early blogging days. We all jumped on the wagon to tell our tales. Some fell off along the way leaving behind a final blog post dated 2009, others turned their blogs into a successful business.

Along come apps and we’re doing the dance all over again – with one difference. You don’t need any technical skill to blog, with apps you need at least a little bit of tech know-how just to get started and a lot of know-how if you want to swim in the big pond.

You could hire someone to build it for you but that leads us to the big question – can the average guy make money with an app?