Marketing Pilgrim's "Mobile" Channel

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Mobile marketers measure conversions but hope for brand awareness

Every success guru will tell you that goals have to be measurable. If you don’t have a means of measuring results you’ll never know if what you’re doing is effective. And, you can’t get where you’re going if you don’t know where the end point is.

Waterfall asked 155 marketing, CRM and data analytics from a cross-section of industries this question:

mobile-marketing-effectiveness155 answers isn’t a very good sampling but even if they’d asked 155,000 people the answer would have been the same. Why? Because counting and measuring lead conversions is easy. There are tools that tell us when someone clicks through on Twitter. We have tools that tell us if they bought something when they hit the site. We have ways of matching up our customer list with our Facebook follower list.

AdWords upgrades with new mobile ads and real-time creatives

Adwords Invitation AdAdWords is upping their game with big changes in mobile design and small changes with big results for display.

Let’s begin with mobile. I just wrote a post about how people pay more attention to ads on a smaller screen but Expanded adsimply shrinking your desktop ads to fit a smartphone isn’t how it should be done. AdWords is rolling out Mobile lightbox Engagement Ads that dynamically resize to fit the screen.

In this example, the ad begins as a thin invitation to click. Then it expands into this intriguing visual with multiple, interactive options. You can watch the video, read more or find a store near you. What more could a customer want?

On a side note, I love the veiled sex appeal in this ad. The soft colors, the bed – it’s positively subliminal.

Study shows consumers are most receptive when they’re out in public

YuMe receptivityIf I’m up against a deadline and I’m pounding away at the keyboard like a mad woman – don’t tell me what you want for Christmas or what we need at the grocery store. I might hear you, but I won’t HEAR you because my mind is closed off to anything but getting that article done.

If you want me to pay attention to what you have to say, you have to wait until I’m in a receptive mood.

The same goes for advertising. The potential customer has to be in a receptive mood before they can pay attention to your ad. And you know where this is going. . . YuMe and IPG Media Lab conducted a study to find out when and where and why people are most receptive to advertising.

Friday Roundup: LinkedIn gets chatty, Yahoo retirees and more

Beam me upAnother Friday is upon us and I have a few new tidbits to share. Grab your favorite beverage and let’s get to it:

LinkedIn Hooks up with WeChat

WeChat, the world’s fastest growing social app (says LinkedIn) now has LinkedIn baked-in. The messaging platform launched in China in 2011 and now has 600 million users (or less, depending on who you ask.) The app does appear to be very popular with users outside of the US and could be very handy if you’re doing business in China or India

When you hook your account up to WeChat you can pull over all your contacts with a few clicks and easily share your LinkedIn profile with people all over the world.

HootSuite Has Something to Crow About

Holiday marketers choose social and data over mobile and shipping

1214648_92719053For their 2014 Holiday Retail Audit, eBay virtually sat down with 1,000 online retailers to find out how they’re preparing for the coming holiday season. Rather than keep you in suspense, I’ll tell you how it out turns out – instead of spending money on mobile and shipping, retailers are banking on data and social this holiday season.

Data:

Retailers said they were going to invest in tools to help them capture and analyze data in greater detail in three areas: social media (29 percent), email promotions (22 percent) and search engine optimization (12 percent).

They’re also looking at ways to capture in-store data so they can have a more meaningful conversation with customers. During the holiday season, speed is essential. If a customer abandons a cart, a retailer needs to be able to spot it, respond to it and send out an instant offer to reel that customer back in.

Want to reach consumers on mobile? Do it before they go shopping

NinthDecimal GrowthSurprise stat of the day: smartphones have replaced tablets as the leading mobile device for retail shoppers.

Surprising because the tablet is the laid back king.  It has the bigger screen and the interactive, native ads, but still tablet usage for research dropped from 37% in 2013 to only 16% in 2014.

The one thing smartphones have over tablets is that we always have one in our pocket. So that’s probably the reason the for the increase. More people are relying on their phones to do research in stores. . .

Nope. 69% of product research happens at home, long before the customer heads to the store (virtual or otherwise).

NinthDecimal’s Mobile Audience Insight Report for Q2 2014 is full of interesting surprises. Let’s dig a little deeper.

Majority of shoppers say no to mobile phones in the checkout line

Cell Phone Acceptable or NotSince we have mobile phones on the brain this week, TheStreet went to the streets to ask people about acceptable phone usage in public. As you might expect, respondents under the age of 35 were much more accepting of all kinds of public usage including texting during the previews at the movies! Sacrilege! That’s almost as bad as leaving before the credits are over.

Talking, texting or surfing while walking was one of the most widely accepted behaviors. 65% of respondents said it was acceptable.

The researchers at Ohio State University beg to differ. They found that in 2010, 1,500 pedestrians were treated in emergency rooms for injuries related to using a cell phone while walking. That’s four years ago. Just imagine what that number is now! And think of how many funny YouTube videos we’d miss out on if people stopped texting and walking. . . .