Marketing Pilgrim's "Mobile" Channel

Sponsor Marketing Pilgrim's Mobile Channel today! Get in front of some of the most influential readers in the Internet and social media marketing industry. Contact us today!

Twitter adds one-touch ad videos to the mobile feed

IMG_0335Hey, Mr. Marketer. Big piece of news that you can use – people love to watch videos. Especially short, funny or exciting videos on their mobile devices. What they don’t like is having to click a bunch of times because clicking is boring.

Twitter’s got you covered. They just began testing a feature that puts the video clip right in the timeline so all the user has to do is click once. I’ve posted an example for you from my iPhone. I don’t follow basketball, but I navigated to the NBA Twitter account and I found a whole bunch of these mini-videos. I clicked, the screen faded to black and then the clip began to play. It was fast and clean and enjoyable. I would have enjoyed it more if it was a hockey clip but it is what it is.

Mobile ad spending growth peaked in 2012, Google losing ground to Facebook

Sure, most people will look at the new predictions from eMarketer and see a “half full” scenario for mobile advertising spending.

That doesn’t make for interesting headlines. ;-)

What jumped out for me was the fact that mobile ad spending growth seems to have peaked. Not surprising, as any market eventually grows large enough that it can no longer support meteoric growth rates. After 120% and 105% growth rates over the past couple of years, mobile ad spending will grow a “paltry” 75% this year.

2014 Mobile Ad Spend

Perhaps the most important stat to watch is Facebook’s growth at the apparent expense of Google.

2014 Mobile Ad Share

Also noteworthy, just how far Twitter is behind Facebook. Really Twitter? Just 0.2% uptick for 2014? Ouch!

Google Play Games adds gifting and more from GDC2014

GDC2014The 2014 Game Developers Conference is underway in San Francisco and this is no small meet-up. We’re talking 23,000 designers and executives from around the globe coming together to swap ideas and expand their horizons.

Our friends a MillennialMedia are hosting a panel called “The Great Debate: Monetizing With In-App Purchases, Pay-for-Download or Advertising.” There’s a session called “Why’d She Buy THAT? Customer Psychology in Game Purchases” and you don’t want to miss “Facebook Unlocked: Trends & Growth Opportunities for Cross-Platform Games (Presented by Facebook)”.

Even if you’re not in the game industry, a lot of what’s happening there is related to what’s happening in mobile and online marketing. Think about it. Every mobile or online game is like a mini-business with its own profit and loss sheet. You have to market the game, create customer loyalty, then convince those people to spend on up-grades and in-app purchases.

Consumers Spend 15 Hours a Week on Mobile Research and Other Mobile Facts

Useablenet Mobile 1Today may be Pi Day but here on the internet, we’re celebrating with cake – birthday cake for the web’s 25th. These days, Mr. Internet is getting by with the help of his friends, Mr. Smartphone and Mr. Tablet. When they work together, they’re an unbeatable force that can either make or break an online marketer.

To demonstrate the power of the pairing, we have a nifty infographic from Usablenet. We begin with a wowzer of a fact:

Every year, the number of global mobile devices and connections increases exponentially. In 2013, there were 7 billion connections – equivalent to the world’s population!

And what are people doing with all of those devices? 79% use them for browsing and shopping on websites and apps.

Shopping for a Mobile Phone: Women Look at Price, Men Look at Features

man womanNielsen just posted some numbers that show the differences in how men and women approach buying a mobile phone. As I skimmed the list, I wondered if the same couldn’t be said for all types of shopping. For example, women said price was the most important consideration when buying a new mobile phone. (72%  vs  67% of men.) Since women are the primary coupon users, it makes sense that they’d be more price conscience.

Men, on the other hand, were far more interested in a phone’s features. They were more interested in battery life, internet connectivity, and screen size. They were way more interested (41% vs 31%) in processor speed which I have to admit is something I never thought about when buying a phone. They were also more likely to be swayed by the operating system. (48% vs 41%)

Yahoo Plays Catch-Up with App Install Ad Test

Yahoo app adWe all know that the fewer clicks that stand between you and your customer, the better chance you’ll have of them completing the purchase. This is especially true for app installs.

Late last year, the number of iPhone apps in the iTunes store was somewhere between 760,000 and a million. A dedicated employee at Gigaom figured out that if you bought all of the paid apps your final bill would total $1.13 million! That’s a lot of cash up for grabs and that’s just a small portion of the total. Add in Android and Windows apps and all of the in-app moneymakers and ads on apps. . . .

Gartner says that by 2017, mobile apps will generate revenue of more than $77 billion, making apps one of the most popular computing tools for users across the globe.

Majority of Marketers Say They Don’t Have the Digital Tools They Need to Succeed

Top PrioritiesThe newly released 2014 Digital Trends report from Econsultancy and Adobe shows that both B2B and B2C marketers are making big changes in the way they reach out to their customers. Unfortunetly, only 23% of marketers believe they have the tools they need to succeed.

Marketers said they were concerned about social media curation tools that block business messages. Others worry that we’ve given customers too many ways to buy exactly what they want so competition keeps growing as customer loyalty fades. But the biggest is the speed at which digital marketing keeps changing.

Said one respondent,

“The creative use of technology coming through the generations [is a key trend]. The 40-year-old marketing director doesn’t have the understanding and natural intuitiveness of the digital natives and so can’t imagine what is coming next. The hyper-connected generation and all its baggage is fast on the horizon.”