Marketing Pilgrim's "Display Advertising" Channel

Marketing Pilgrim's Display Advertising Channel is sponsored by AdClarity. AdClarity helps online media buyers and planners uncover their competitors’ media plans, campaigns, creatives, best performing publishers, mediators and traffic sources.

Google Philandering Behind DoubleClick’s Back?

Yesterday we mentioned that it looked like the FTC would soon give the Google/DoubleClick acquisition the green light after all. But Google’s not going to let that stop them: paidContent reports today that Google is exploring more partnerships, regardless of whether their current deal goes through:

the company also hopes to charm ad agencies and TV networks that appear increasingly concerned about the online giant’s respective online ad moves and its audience measurement agreement with EchoStar.

They didn’t, however, ignore the pending merger completely:

In terms of looking for the connectivity tissue between supply and demand, DoubleClick fits very squarely into our strategy. Given that strategy, one of the things we exploring the ability to work with multiple partners. We feel very strongly that the deal should be approved, in light of the approvals our competitors have received.

NBC Pulls Videos from iTunes

NBC’s contract with the iTunes store has expired, which means NBC no longer has content on the site. That means Battlestar Galactica, The Office, NBC News, CNBC, NBC Sports, and other popular show are gone. The two have been long fighting over pricing.

NBC has launched a number of new initiatives like NBC Direct where downloads are free. They also have deals with NetFlix and others to distribute their content, often free, rather than the $1.99 charged on iTunes. NBC wanted to experiment with different prices and bundles but iTunes refused.

The problem with NBC Direct Player is that it requires Internet Explorer, a proprietary player, and the latest .Net framework. You can watch the videos 7 days after they are released and they expire 48 hours after you begin watching a movie. You can’t watch them on another computer or on a portable video player like your iPod. A Mac version is planned for next year.

Sites Let Bloggers Make Money on Photos

With the popularity of Flickr photo sharing site, some people get shortchanged for their work. Two sites are finding ways to compensate the photographer and the bloggers who post their photos.

I learned about photo money for bloggers first from Photrade, at BlogWorldExpo. Now stock photography company Corbis is offering bloggers to use some of their images free. The images have ads embedded in them (and show up when you mouse over them) or the ad is an overlay on top of the image.

Rather than user-generated they are professional pictures. Corbis has more than 100 million creative, entertainment and historic images from top photographers. They will offer the images through the site Picapp. The images can be tracked and the company can determine if they’re used illegally. Bloggers earn revenue when people click on the images.

Online Advertising and Display Ads Rise

Internet advertising as a whole is steadily rising. The Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) and PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (PwC) announced in early October that Internet advertising has reached a new record of $4.9 billion for the first quarter of 2007. Last year first quarter revenues were at $3.8 billion – a 26 percent increase.

I recently read a MarketingSherpa article on one type of online advertising that is making a small comeback. Some call them banner ads some call them online display ads, but according to MarketingSherpa, they are back in vogue. Why? They are lower cost other online advertising methods. MarketingSherpa published a helpful introduction to this advertising medium.

Yahoo Partners with Adobe to Bring Ads to PDFs

If you’re thinking of creating an e-book and can’t decide whether to give it away for free or charge for your hard work, you now have a third option. Yahoo and Adobe have teamed up to provide contextually relevant ads for PDF documents.

According to CNET, publishers upload their PDFs to Yahoo (we assume via Yahoo! Publisher) and then text ads appear in a panel to the right of the main PDF content. The ads are dynamic, giving them flexibility to change based on the content.

Here’s a screenshot from CNET:

Google Checkout Holiday Promotions

Back when Paypal was x.com (about seven years ago) I had a deal email list called Scrapdogs. I sent emails to my friends about all the amazing free things that retailers were throwing away giving out. Almost every Christmas present I bought was purchased online that Christmas, and it’s still my favorite way to shop.

Check out the list of deals for Google Checkout users. Here’s an example of the savings: Buy.com – get $10 off orders over $10 (for new buyers only). There is also free shipping and frequent flyer miles to be earned (make sure to view the tabs because they’re easy to miss). You have to register and then you can earn 2 frequent flyer miles for each $1 you spend with Google Checkout through December 31, 2007. They cap the miles at 10,000 and it’s for US residents only.

What Customers Want: More Detailed Product Descriptions

Want people to come to your site a little longer this holiday season? Then give customers adequate information about your products. This isn’t new but WebCollage’s 2007 Survey of Online Consumer Product Research Habits confirms how important product information is to shoppers.

79 percent of those surveyed “rarely or never” purchase a product without complete product information.
- the e-tailing group

Shoppers want to know if a product is compatible with the products they already own and easily see what accessories come with a product. I was researching a CD/clock radio for my son’s room and couldn’t tell if the models worked with headphones (so if he wakes up early to listen to some music, I don’t have to). It was impossible to tell by the pictures and product descriptions, so I had to go to an actual store.