Marketing Pilgrim's Reputation Channel

Marketing Pilgrim's Reputation Channel is sponsored by Trackur.

Reuters Taps Attributor to Monitor Content Scraping

Content scrapers and spammers beware! Reuters is upping its efforts to find unauthorized use of its original content.

The news company has asked Attributor to assign a fingerprint to all Reuters’ content and monitor the web in real-time, looking for those that simply swipe entire stories.

As well as coming down on content thieves, Reuters will look for legitimate sites that it can sign distribution deals with.

“Attributor’s technology gives us the critical business intelligence to pursue new opportunities for licensing and use of original content,” said Ric Camacho, Vice President, Digital Syndication at Reuters in a press release. “This agreement is part of Reuters strategy of innovation as we continue to develop next-generation digital news syndication.”

Yes, Brands are Conversations

Ok, it’s been a while since I’ve disagreed with CNET’s Elinor Mills–something that rarely happens, as she’s a fantastic journalist–but here goes. :-)

Mills attended FM Publishing’s Conversational Marketing Summit and is somewhat skeptical that marketing and conversations can mix together.

Hold on. Who asked marketers to join readers online? I know blog publishers need to make money, and they do earn revenue off regular old text, video and banner ads. But I’m suspicious when the “conversation” is initiated by the marketer and not the consumer.

And what’s this with the slogan of the conference–”Brands are conversations”? No, they aren’t.

Apple Salvages Reputation with iPhone Consolation

When Steve Jobs announced the $200 price reduction of the 2-month old iPhone, many of Apple’s early adopters cried foul. Having shown their loyalty to Apple by standing in line for hours–for a chance to be one of the first to buy the revolutionary phone–they now felt betrayed at such a quick and dramatic price drop.

Fortunately, the Apple CEO quickly sensed the swell of bitterness–growing among its loyal customers–and jumped in to offer a $100 Apple credit to those that had previously coughed up $599 for the iPhone. In addition, those that had purchased an iPhone in the past 2 weeks would get a $200 refund.

New York Times Archives Causing Google Reputation Nightmares

It seems the New York Times search engine optimization efforts are working well–maybe a little too well for some.

Now that more of the NYT’s archives are appearing in Google’s search results, many individuals are finding their past is catching up with them. Worse, it’s the NYT’s version of their past that contains misinformation.

People are coming forward at the rate of roughly one a day to complain that they are being embarrassed, are worried about losing or not getting jobs, or may be losing customers because of the sudden prominence of old news articles that contain errors or were never followed up.

As publishers struggle to compete with new media sources, they’re going to find more and more instances of stories that are outdated or don’t include any updates.

Morgan Stanley Massaging YouTube Revenue Numbers?

How about a nice massage to start off your morning? Sorry, no scented oils or sounds of crashing waves here. Instead, we’re talking about the suggestion by TechDirt that Morgan Stanley internet analyst Mary Meeker massaged her YouTube calculations in order to fix a previous mistake.

After having her mistake pointed out to her by none other than Henry Blodget, Meeker went back and fixed the report. But she did more than just correct the math. She also tweaked some of her original assumptions so as to boost the significance of the new advertising scheme. Whereas she originally predicted that ads would be shown on approximately 1% of streams, that number has now been boosted to yield a greater revenue impact. Meeker’s new model now has the company garnering an additional $75-$189 million in net revenue over the coming year, as compared to the $720,000 that her original model predicted.

Social Media Monitoring Tools: 26 Free Online Reputation Tools

There are a lot of companies that will happily relieve you of your dollars, in exchange for buzz monitoring services. While many large companies will enjoy the peace of mind that comes from having a company track their reputation for them, the rest of us need something a little less expensive–or better yet, free!

We’ve compiled a list of twenty six buzz monitoring tools that are free of charge. Use these tools to keep track of your company reputation or even spy on your competition! Take a look at Trackur.com if you need all-in-one social media monitoring tools.

1. Your Industry
buzz-monitoring1

If you simply don’t have time to track everything that specifically relates to your company–or your competition–you can still track news that relates to your industry. Moreover and Yahoo are just a couple of resources that offer RSS feeds for aggregated industry news.

Quoted in Business Week – “Good Enough” IS Good Enough?

This week’s edition of Business Week turns the Skype outage into an article on whether we’re content with “good enough” technology.

As I was open with the issues I faced thanks to Skype going down for 30+ hours, I ended up chatting with Stephen Baker about the challenges faced by not having access to the service.

Andy Beal was one of 220 million subscribers to Skype, the cut-rate Internet telephony service owned by eBay (EBAY ), who saw the service go dark on Aug. 16. A software glitch kept it down for the next two days. Founder of the Raleigh (N.C.) Internet marketing consultancy Marketing Pilgrim, Beal learned that Skype was out an hour before clients were to call him from Holland. He had to message them in a hurry, telling them to call his tenuous backup: the cell phone. “It was embarrassing,” he says. But at least the cell phone worked–which isn’t always the case.