Marketing Pilgrim's Reputation Channel

Marketing Pilgrim's Reputation Channel is sponsored by Trackur.

Have You Set Standards for Using Your Brand Online?

As someone writing a book on online reputation, you can imagine my excitement when I read the headline of the latest e-consultancy article: “Top ten hints on managing your brand online.”

Unfortunately, either I’m just too obsessed with the topic, or e-consultancy didn’t quite get the title right, because the “ten hints” actually refer to managing “brand standards”, that is how and where your brand is used in an online environment.

Ok, so once I got over my initial disappointment, I discovered an article that is actually very useful and on a topic not often discussed. When companies create their brand, they often go to great lengths to document what colors to use in the logo and how to capitalize each word in the company name. A lot of that gets lost when you move to the web – perhaps we feel the web is less strict and so cut a few corners. Regardless of the medium, companies that value their brand should ensure that they use it consistently across all channels.

Spotting Negative Social Media Marketing

There has been plenty of chatter in the last couple of days about ways that people could be negatively affecting your search engine marketing strategy. People are right to be worried, you only have to look at your search referrals to see how many people are typing in your brand name into the search engines. If there’s some mud slinging going on in your SERPs; plenty of people could end up reading it.

The Google results aren’t the only battle ground for disgruntled customers or unethical competitors. Everyman and his dog are getting involved in social media, and it’s here where the next round of fights will take place. So it’s worth thinking about where and how your rivals could be doing damage to your business.

Reputation Management vs. Search Engine Sabotage

An article in yesterday’s Washington Post follows the online reputation misfortunes of Sue Scheff, a consultant to parents of troubled teenagers. Scheff found that Google searches on her name produced many negative results from a disgruntled customer, and she didn’t know how to fight back. Scheff hired an online reputation management company to fix the problem.

Online reputation management has been around for some time. And with the advent of Web 2.0 technologies and social media, the opportunity for feedback itself outranking a website is greater than ever. Companies, and even individuals, are finding it more important than ever to outrank (or even push out for that matter) the negative results about them in the search rankings.

Pilgrim’s Picks for July 2

Wow, it’s July already! Here’s what’s interesting in today’s feeds…

Google’s “Sicko” BlogStorm

As Brittany reported over the weekend, Google blogger Lauren Turner made a faux pas, when she added her personal opinions to an official Google blog post. After a weekend blogstorm (that’s two weekends in a row we’ve had one), Turner posted a clarification (although no apology)…

Well, I’ve learned a few things since I posted on Friday. For one thing, even though this is a new blog, we have readers! That’s a good thing. Not so good is that some readers thought the opinion I expressed about the movie Sicko was actually Google’s opinion. It’s easy to understand why it might have seemed that way, because after all, this is a corporate blog. So that was my mistake — I understand why it caused some confusion.

Is the Australian PM watching his Online Reputation?

With a nation-wide Federal election coming up this year, we thought we’d track Australian Prime Minister John Howard’s online reputation and find out what’s being said about him online.

We tracked online references of both Howard and the opposition leader, Kevin Rudd, over a three week period, and the results are not looking so good for the PM.

Though most of online references come from news sites, and are mostly neutral, the more freely expressive bloggers sometimes had quite nasty things to say about John Howard, and there were not many on his side at all.

Rudd, on the other hand, though he had his fair share of nasty comments, actually had more backers than critics. This is a particularly positive response for Australia, where a common attitude, particularly from the younger generations, towards politicians is fairly negative (there were, in fact, quite a few bloggers with that opinion).

Exclusive: 15 of 18 Presidential Candidates Have Negative Search Listings

With 16 months until the 2008 Presidential election, we thought it would be interesting to conduct a study of the search engine reputation of current candidates. We examined the first 20 results on Google and Yahoo for the ten Republicans and eight Democrats to see who had the best and worst online reputation.

The results were startling, with only three candidates fully in control of their search engine reputation. Who were they? How did Hillary and Barack fair?

I won’t spoil the surprise, so head over to the 2008 Presidential Election Candidate Reputation Study for the breakdown.