Marketing Pilgrim's Reputation Channel

Marketing Pilgrim's Reputation Channel is sponsored by Trackur.

Can Blogosphere Force Amazon to Withdraw Alexaholic Lawsuit?

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos has been caught saying one thing and doing another. According to ZDNet, while Bezos was chatting at the Web 2.0 conference and promoting his company’s S3 hosting service to the crowd, he was quietly suing the pants off of Alexaholic.

Quietly that is, until host Tim O’Reilly put Bezos on the spot.

O’Reilly asked Bezos point blank about the whole Alexa versus Alexaholic…Bezos seemed to be caught completely off guard by this question and tried to explain Alexa’s stand with that age old “intellectual property” and “trademark” line. It was clear that all O’Reilly wanted to see was a shift in Alexa’s policies, to be more open with the Web 2.0 community, and to hopefully foster an amicable solution for a service that he really liked and respected. That being Statsaholic. 

Spock Hopes to Make Your Face the Final Frontier

I’m not quite sure where Spock got its name – maybe they picked up the domain for cheap and liked the name recognition – but the people search engine behind it, looks impressive.

Michael Arrington has the exclusive screenshots of the new service that aims to index and aggregate information on individuals, and help the many millions of us that use search engines to research the famous and not-so famous.

Similar services already exist – LinkedIn, Zoominfo and Naymz are among the many that come to mind – but Spock is aiming to scour the web, scrub it of duplication and even allow people to claim their profile page.

Your Online Identity Could Ruin Your Love Life

It’s not just potential employers that are Googling your name, you also have to worry about your next date doing the same. According to AP, more people than ever are using Google as a free background checker, before deciding whether to risk dinner and a movie with someone.

The results can be enlightening, surprising and, sometimes, a little disturbing…In her dating life, she regularly did online research on her dates and turned up, among other things, “bizarre” fetishes and a guy who was fascinated with vampires.

It’s not just Google potential mates use to get the 411 on a new beau. Many young daters are digging into their social networks, using MySpace or Facebook to see what they can learn about their next date.

Why You Can’t Simply "Destroy" Your Online Past

The latest Business Week article, “Web Attack“, looks at how you should monitor your web reputation and steps you can take to try and respond to negative reviews, blogs and forums, etc.

Reputation monitoring and management is a vital tactic for any company (or individual) interested in what the web has to say about them, but it’s important to know that “engaging” your critics does not mean using an automated process to squash them. You can’t hope to hire a firm to wipe out your past transgressions, if you’re not changing your habits and reaching out to those who challenge you.

That’s why it’s important to highlight this bold claim by ReputationDefender…

Get Your Free Online PR Briefing

Now that E-consultancy is fully on my radar – and in my inbox – I’m impressed by the amount of free content that comes out of this UK marketing resource.

Today, our readers can head on over to their site and pick up a free copy of their “Online PR Briefing“, which covers:

  • What is Online PR?
  • Which department or agency should own Online PR?
  • SEO and Online PR
  • Importance of bloggers
  • Affiliates and Online PR
  • Brands and Forums

We’ll assume it’s just an oversight that they didn’t include our “Beginners Guide to Online Reputation Monitoring” in their list of resources. ;-)

Online Reputations a Big Trend in 2007

We’ve already seen an increase in news related to online reputation management in the last few days, and now Wired magazine lists it as one of the top trends for 2007.

Their excellent article “The See-Through CEO” looks at how businesses are becoming more transparent with their communications and how consumers are wielding a lot of influence over your online brand equity.

“Online is where reputations are made now,” says Leslie Gaines Ross, chief reputation strategist – yes, that’s her actual title – with the PR firm Weber Shandwick. She regularly speaks to companies that realize a single Google search determines more about how they’re perceived than a multimillion-dollar ad campaign. “It used to be that you’d look only at your reputation in newspapers and broadcast media, positive and negative. But now the blogosphere is equally powerful, and it has different rules. Public relations used to be about having stuff taken down, and you can’t do that with the Internet.”

29 of Fortune 100 Have Negative Google Results

I thought we’d find some gems by keeping an eye on the blogs of our readers, and 97th Floor proves us right.

They reviewed Google search results for the companies that make up the Fortune 100 list and found that 29 of them have search listings that could hurt their brand.

While it’s not a shock to see Walmart, Exxon Mobile and Dell on the list, others are surprising, such as:

5.) State Farm Insurance – Two Sites one is “Consumer Affairs” has consumer complaints about the company. The other is “Law Cornell .edu” it is information about a major Law Suit.

19.) Duke Energy – One site “Duke Energy Employee Advocate” which is very negative about how the employees are lied to and treated poorly.