Marketing Pilgrim's Reputation Channel

Marketing Pilgrim's Reputation Channel is sponsored by Trackur.

Why You Can’t Simply "Destroy" Your Online Past

The latest Business Week article, “Web Attack“, looks at how you should monitor your web reputation and steps you can take to try and respond to negative reviews, blogs and forums, etc.

Reputation monitoring and management is a vital tactic for any company (or individual) interested in what the web has to say about them, but it’s important to know that “engaging” your critics does not mean using an automated process to squash them. You can’t hope to hire a firm to wipe out your past transgressions, if you’re not changing your habits and reaching out to those who challenge you.

That’s why it’s important to highlight this bold claim by ReputationDefender…

Get Your Free Online PR Briefing

Now that E-consultancy is fully on my radar – and in my inbox – I’m impressed by the amount of free content that comes out of this UK marketing resource.

Today, our readers can head on over to their site and pick up a free copy of their “Online PR Briefing“, which covers:

  • What is Online PR?
  • Which department or agency should own Online PR?
  • SEO and Online PR
  • Importance of bloggers
  • Affiliates and Online PR
  • Brands and Forums

We’ll assume it’s just an oversight that they didn’t include our “Beginners Guide to Online Reputation Monitoring” in their list of resources. ;-)

Online Reputations a Big Trend in 2007

We’ve already seen an increase in news related to online reputation management in the last few days, and now Wired magazine lists it as one of the top trends for 2007.

Their excellent article “The See-Through CEO” looks at how businesses are becoming more transparent with their communications and how consumers are wielding a lot of influence over your online brand equity.

“Online is where reputations are made now,” says Leslie Gaines Ross, chief reputation strategist – yes, that’s her actual title – with the PR firm Weber Shandwick. She regularly speaks to companies that realize a single Google search determines more about how they’re perceived than a multimillion-dollar ad campaign. “It used to be that you’d look only at your reputation in newspapers and broadcast media, positive and negative. But now the blogosphere is equally powerful, and it has different rules. Public relations used to be about having stuff taken down, and you can’t do that with the Internet.”

29 of Fortune 100 Have Negative Google Results

I thought we’d find some gems by keeping an eye on the blogs of our readers, and 97th Floor proves us right.

They reviewed Google search results for the companies that make up the Fortune 100 list and found that 29 of them have search listings that could hurt their brand.

While it’s not a shock to see Walmart, Exxon Mobile and Dell on the list, others are surprising, such as:

5.) State Farm Insurance – Two Sites one is “Consumer Affairs” has consumer complaints about the company. The other is “Law Cornell .edu” it is information about a major Law Suit.

19.) Duke Energy – One site “Duke Energy Employee Advocate” which is very negative about how the employees are lied to and treated poorly.

Online Reputation Tool Serph Leaves Beta

Back in January, we mentioned that Pronet Advertising had an online reputation monitoring tool, Serph, in open beta. Well, they don’t anymore. Cameron Olthuis has announced that Serph left beta today.

I thought I’d give it a whirl. I got 23 results for my full name. Number 21 and 22 were the first results from Marketing Pilgrim itself. Two of the top ten results are from domains that look like random strings of letters and numbers (which will not load in my browser).

Four of my top ten results are scraped content from one article I wrote for a client almost a year ago republished four times on the same blog (I suppose I’m lucky that they preserved my byline). One top tenner appears to be scraped from the one ranked right after it.

How a Great Online Reputation Can Win You a Job

Following up on the recent news, suggesting many recruiters use search engines to pre-screen job candidates, business social network Viadeo reports 20% of employers find information about candidates online and 59% are influenced by what they find.

As we pointed out, sharing your drunken exploits on MySpace, could come back to haunt you.

Examples of online information that has been shown to create negative information include MySpace pages that reveal excessive drinking or disrespect for work. One survey respondent said his company rejected a candidate based on activities found online that “did not fit ethically” into the organization.

However, it’s not all bad news. Having a good online presence can actually do a lot to help you get a job.

SoWeSay Puts Your Reputation in the Hands of Others

One of the most common features you’ll find in social networks such as LinkedIn, is the ability to recommend others and effectively vouch for their credibility.

SoWeSay is a new social networking site that focuses purely on peer review and recommendation, allowing you to create profiles, rate and review anyone you know or encounter online and offline.

Ok, we’ll have to watch this one. On one hand, I like the idea of being able to share your opinion on others, but I don’t like the lack of accountability. You don’t have to prove you know the person, in order to share a review, and you can also post the review anonymously – both could open up the service to abuse.