Marketing Pilgrim's Reputation Channel

Marketing Pilgrim's Reputation Channel is sponsored by Trackur.

Should Tax Questions Surrounding Apple Impact Its Reputation?

Apple TargetWe talk a lot about reputation here at Marketing Pilgrim. After all, our founder, Andy Beal has quite a reputation himself in the fast growing field of reputation management, monitoring and online listening.

With that in mind we often see stories a little bit differently than some. Today’s case in point is the tax avoidance story that is currently surrounding Apple. The company is already getting dinged here and there with some reputation matters, like cnet’s “Customers Not As Happy With iPhone As The Were Last Year” (which carries an alarmist headline and not much else to be concerned about but it’s the headline that people actually read so ….) and the Apple Maps concerns of last year. Also, there are concerns about the direction and general health of the company in the post Steve Jobs era which sometimes directly indicts current CEO Tim Cooke.

Facebook Appears Clueless As To What Android Users Actually Want

facebook-icon 1If a company just entered the Fortune 500 for the first time which makes it one of the largest (and almost automatically, well respected) companies in America it might be reasonable to think that there is some decent thinking going on there, right?

Apparently at Facebook that might be asking too much. Now, to be fair, it’s not like the company is completely in the dark. It’s done a great job getting to where it is today. The trouble for the company, and for those investing in the company, is that it is making some bold statements about its future being in mobile. As a result, you get Facebook Home for Android which is supposed to take the Facebook experience to a new level and practically immerse the user in a Facebook driven world.

JCPenney Ad Asks Customers to Come Back …. Please

One retailer that has had some serious missteps in the recent past is JCPenney.

It seemed as if the company couldn’t go a day without something getting skewered by the press or, even worse, their customers.

So what’s a company to do when it has apparently lost its way so badly? Well, fire your CEO and put together an ad like this is one option.

What do you think of that one?

Forbes says

As former CEO Mike Ullman goes about stemming the bleeding, J.C. Penney is going on the offensive, apologizing to shoppers alienated by Johnson’s controversial store revamps.

In the ad, the company shies away from directly addressing Johnson’s upgrades, including Denim Bars to help J.C. Penney shoppers find the perfect jeans, not unlike Apple’s Genius Bars.

Twitter Doesn’t Exactly Instill Confidence in Memo to Journalists

imagessources-unreliableTwitter has taken a bit of a reputation ding after the hijacking of the AP Twitter account last week. Financial markets dipped and now federal attention is being given to the activities to see who profited from this event.

The result has been the promise, or the rumor, of a two step authentication process. Uhhh, those are nice words but until it’s in place and works it means absolutely nothing. Now to add to the uncertainty that surrounds the security of a Twitter account and, as a result, the reliability of the service in ‘reporting’ the news (God help us if Twitter is actually seen as a reliable breaking news source ever but it seems inevitable) is the following memo sent to journalists trying to help them protect their Twitter accounts.

BuzzFeed provided the contents of the memo and here it is.

Samsung Posts Fake Reviews and Enters Reputation Hall of Shame

One of Samsung's CEOs Trust MeSamsung has been on a pretty good roll for a bit, haven’t they? Their smartphones have become what many feel is a real competitor to Apple’s iPhone which is a tremendous accomplishment in and of itself. When things are going well you do what you can to keep the momentum going, right?

Well, in Samsung’s case they appear to have gotten their hand caught so far in the cookie jar that they have needed to apologize for violating one of the most basic rules of doing ethical online business: don’t fake reviews. According to Techspot Samsung is simply admitting to screwing up without really even fighting.

Officials in Taiwan are investigating claims that Samsung paid people to post favorable reviews about their products online while at the same time offering up negative feedback on rival HTC’s products. The investigation launched after the Fair Trade Commission received numerous complaints on the matter.

Apple Does Corporate Reputation Dance With Chinese Government

apple-warranty-china-tim-cook-apologyApple has never been known for making apologies about much of anything. Folks were a bit shocked by CEO Tim Cook’s mea culpa last year regarding the Apple Maps troubles the company experienced.

Well, it’s interesting just what a threat to adding to the gazillion or so dollars the company has (at one point recently Apple had more cash on hand than the US government) can do.

The latest threat to making Apple even richer comes from the world’s largest market, China. Don’t worry, Apple is doing just fine in China but it recently got the Chinese government agitated and, well, that’s not good for business. It’s so bad for business in fact that Tim Cook offered another public apology.

USA Today reports

Tiger, Nike, Winning, Social Media and Reputation

Nike and Tiger Woods are no strangers to controversy. Nike has created its brand tying its name to famous athlete. That can be either a boom or bust proposition. Just ask them about Lance Armstrong.

Tiger, on the other hand, is trying to remake his once invincible image and Nike is going along for the ride. What’s creating controversy is while Armstrong has been vilified for his version of cheating, Woods is getting a much different treatment from Nike as he rebounds from HIS version of cheating (which was about marital infidelity and not the game he plays, for now at least).

So now Tiger has fought his way back to the top of his profession as he regains the number 1 ranking in the world of golf. Nike’s response? This message that was put throughout their social channels.