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Sentiment Analysis for Internet Explorer; Comparing to Firefox


Digg!

This is another post in the “IE 7 Sucks” series. This time, I’ve been poking around at data that suggests IE 7 really is crap, and it’s not just readers of Marketing Pilgrim, that think so.

Taking a look at Opinmind, we learn that only 24% of bloggers have a positive sentiment towards Internet Explorer, compared to 69% positive with Firefox.

Switching to Technorati, we discover 632 bloggers have stated “internet explorer sucks“, compared to 274 who think the same of Firefox.

Using Google Trends, it’s clear that more people are looking to download Firefox, compared to IE. In contrast, more users are looking to uninstall Internet Explorer, than FF.

MySpace Claims 85% of all Teen Social Network Users

A new Pew Internet & American Life Project survey of U.S. teens aged 12 to 17, reveals 55% of those with internet access visit social networking sites and of those 85% prefer MySpace.

Hidden in the data is a clue of how these teens will help ensure social networks become key to marketers in the future. Just 5% of those surveyed admit they don’t actually participate – they just “lurk”. With 95% of them actively engaging their peers, those marketers not including social networks and word-of-mouth in their marketing mix, will find it increasingly difficult to reach the consumer of tomorrow.

Via Reuters.

“Immigrant Entrepreneurs” Generate $52B

A new study from Duke University found that of companies started between 1995-2005, 25% had at least one foreign-born senior executive. By 2005, immigrants had founded 52% of Silicon Valley companies (up from 25% in a 1999 Berkeley study). Companies run by these “immigrant entrepreneurs” accounted for approximately 450,000 jobs and $52 billion in sales in 2005.

Researchers also report that 24% of patent applications last year were made by foreign-born inventors living in the United States without citizenship. In 1998, only 7.3% of filings were made by resident non-citizens.

The full reports include breakdowns by country of origin and state as well as focus studies on Silicon Valley and Research Triangle Park companies. That makes me like it twice as much: it’s by Duke (I love my Blue Devils) and focuses on my home (RTP).

Track Your RSS Reading Trends With Google Reader

Google’s added a nifty little tool to Google Reader that allows you to view stats on your RSS reading trends. I’m not quite sure how this information is going to help me – other than prove I am addicted to blog reading – but it’s somewhat fun to examine.

What would be cool is to see this data across the entire Google Reader user base (anonymous of course). It would be interesting to see when others do their reading.

Anyway, seeing as Darren and Matt have both shared details of their reading habits, here are some of mine.

Traditional Media Struggles to Monetize User-Generated Content

Reuters has details of a new report from Deloitte that looks at media trends for 2007. Part of the report focuses on how successful mainstream media will be at integrating user-generated content. The biggest problem appears to be how they’ll make money from user  content.

Howard Davies, a director of media strategy at Deloitte explains why it’s tough to make money from social media.

“There’s something about the social user … community that is absolutely not professional and so the community doesn’t want it to be commercialised,” he said about advertising around Web sites dedicated to the content.

Michael Arrington’s Tech Companies to Watch in 2007

TechCrunch’s infamous Michael Arrington has listed the “Web 2.0″ companies he couldn’t live without in 2007, but we may as well call it “the top tech companies to watch in 2007″.

It’s a list most marketers should consider reviewing. While it has some tech companies that don’t quite cross into marketing, Arrington’s list is full of social media and search companies, including Ask City, BlueDot, Digg, Flickr, YouTube and more.

100 Billion Reasons to Celebrate this Year

comScore Networks reports that online retail spending reached $100 billion for the year as of Saturday, December 23. It looks like procrastinators placed their faith in expedited shipping, as the last business week before Christmas saw $2.25 billion in eCommerce.

2006 year-to-date spending was up by 26% over 2005, but the last week before Christmas increased 38% over the same period in 2005.

Gian Fulgoni, chairman of comScore Networks, stated in a press release:

Retail e-commerce now accounts for approximately 7 percent of consumers’ U.S. retail spending (excluding gas, autos and food), making it an important component of the total U.S. economy.

From Nov. 1 to Dec. 26, Amazon.com had the highest online retail sales, followed by Dell, Yahoo, Walmart and Ticketmaster. The etailers with the highest percentage increase over last year were Best Buy, Walmart, Ticketmaster, Circuit City and Yahoo.