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The Ultimate Secret to Getting Your Website to Dominate Its Industry

Want to know the best way to push any website to the #1 popularity spot for its industry? It’s quite simple, you leverage the traffic from one of Google’s existing properties.

Need proof?

Google’s Blog Search has taken over the #1 spot from Technorati, thanks to a link placed on the homepage of Google News. Hitwise explains how that helped the Google service leapfrog Technorati in just a few weeks.

Google Blog Search began catching up to Technorati in October, when Google placed a link to Blog Search on the Google News home page, causing a 168% surge in market share for Google Blog Search over a two week period (week ending 10/14/06 vs. week ending 10/28/06). Since then, approximately 60% of Google Blog Search’s traffic has been coming directly from Google News, compared to less than 1% before the change.

Outlook for Mobile Marketing: Billions or bupkis?

Today eMarketer Daily compiled conflicting reports on the future of mobile marketing. According to “Mobile Entertainment’s Potential Sharply Debated” by John du Pre Gauntt (free & live on a limited basis), the predictions for mobile revenues vary wildly:

In November 2006, Juniper Research forecast that total revenues for wireless providers from mobile entertainment in the mobile music, video, TV, gambling, gaming and adult categories would exceed $77 billion by 2011.

One month later, Informa Telecoms & Media followed with a mobile entertainment forecast that stated the total market in 2011 would be $38.1 billion.

eMarketer attributes the $40 billion difference to “wildcards” such as WiFi in the US and international wireless markets, especially China and India which are set to grow exponentially in the immediate future.

Safe search is ON

Following up on their May study, McAfee reports that search results have become safer on Google, Ask and AOL. Yahoo and MSN now return riskier results than they did in May.

How does McAfee define “risk”? They have three levels:

Red ratings are given to risky sites that fail one or more of McAfee’s tests for adware, spyware, viruses, exploits, spammy e- mail, excessive pop-ups or strong affiliations with other red rated sites. Green rated sites passed each of these tests. Yellow ratings are given to sites which pass McAfee’s safety tests but which still have nuisances warranting a user advisory.

Overall, “riskiness” declined 12%, with a 6% decline in sponsored search. McAfee considered 8% of sponsored results red or yellow, while only 3% of organic results are classified as red or yellow.

The Internet is the first choice for purchasing decisions

Last week, Vertis Communications released their Consumer Focus® Tech Savvy study. The headline they ran with was “Future Plans Reveal Women to be More Tech Savvy.” That conclusion was based on their finding that 74% of Generation Y women (born 1977-1994) are planning on buying at least one electronic device in the next year, versus 58% of all 3000 adults surveyed. (Electronic devices included televisions, cell phones, digital cameras, satellite dishes and more.)

The study’s most interesting stat for an Internet marketer? Gen Y men’s answer to the question “When you are ready to make a purchase, which media do you turn to first to help you with your decision?” 38% said the Internet was their first choice to help them make a purchasing decision. That was up from 21% in 2004. In fact, the Internet was the only medium to see an increase in that time period (unless you count “None”).

Cyber Monday: publicity stunt come true?

Last year when reports about Cyber Monday came out, I was skeptical. However, it looks as though Cyber Monday is a real phenomenon—but not exactly as Shop.org claimed when they fabricated the term last year.

comScore reports that the best single day for online commerce this year was indeed a Monday—Monday, December 11. With $661 million in sales, this past Monday beat the record-setting Monday the week before (December 4, $647 million). Last year’s peak day? December 12, 2005—also a Monday ($556 million).

It looks like the theory behind Cyber Monday proved correct—people do a lot of online shopping when they get back to work after a break. However, instead of the Monday after Thanksgiving being the peak, people just buy more and more on successive Mondays.

Is MySpace Really Larger than Yahoo?

So, Red Herring tells us that a new comScore report will show that MySpace had more page views in November than Yahoo.

What I would like to know is what was the average length of visit for those page views. It’s one thing to throw a lot of crap against a wall, but how much of it is sticking. In other words, which of the two sites does a better job of engaging its visitors?

At first glance, you may think MySpace is the winner. After all, it has more page views, with fewer visitors than Yahoo. But, there’s so much junk on MySpace, I’m curious to learn the average visit length of a MySpace visitor, compared to Yahoo.

Anyone seen the numbers for this?

Maybe Alexa Stats Can Be Trusted After All

Well look what the Alexa folks shared on their blog. They took the publicly available Sitemeter stats for a couple of web sites and matched them against the Alexa traffic history graphs.

Here’s the comparison for TechCrunch.

The green graph is the site stats and the blue line is Alexa overlaying them.

Interesting, Rand, what do ya think? It appears Alexa is able to get the numbers right, relative to data within one site, maybe they just suck at comparing data from differnt sites.