Marketing Pilgrim's "Search Marketing" Channel

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Google’s biggest spender could be their next biggest competitor

Last year, Amazon spent $157.7 million on Google U.S. search ads. As this chart from AdAge shows, they were the number one buyer of ads by far, which is ironic since they’re actively working on an advertising network of their own.

Google This Adage

Yep, Amazon is paying big money to a company they hope to compete with in the future. It’s really not all that surprising. Custora says almost 44% of all US ecommerce transactions in Q1 2014 began with a search engine. And though there are other ways of searching the internet, no one can deny that Google is king. Even Amazon can’t take that away from them.

Here are a few more stats from Google:

Walmart sending customers to other etailers? It’s not a miracle, it’s Adsense

Sponsored Product Ads on WalmartIn the classic Christmas movie Miracle on 34th Street, Macy’s’ Santa Claus is caught sending customers to competitor Gimbels because making a child happy is more important than making a buck. At first, the Macy’s execs are horrified until they realize that what they’ll gain in goodwill by continuing the practice will actually improve sales over all.

I think Walmart must have been having a “miracle” moment when they agreed to be part of the new Google Adsense for Shopping program.

I searched Walmart.com for a Frozen throw and this is what turned up in the sidebar – ads for related products from OTHER retailers. If you click that blue question mark at the top, this is what pops up:

Isn’t that special: Google introduces AdWords Callout Extensions

What is it that makes your business standout from the competition? Award-winning? Open 24 hours? Only local ingredients? Free Shipping on All Orders? Whatever it is, Google is giving you a chance to tell the world with the new AdWords Callout Extensions.

Adwords Call outs

Callouts create an additional line of descriptive text underneath your existing ad. A callout must be less than 25 characters but you can create up to four per ad. You can’t use “gimmicky” symbols such as hearts and smiles (Do advertisers really use hearts and smiles on their ads?) and you can’t duplicate callouts – meaning you can’t just write “free shipping” four times.

For general campaigns, Google recommends words such as “special discounts” or “price-matcing.”

You can pay and pay but organic search still wins

BrightEdge sent over a new report called “Cracking the Content Code” and since I’m all about content, I had to share it with you.

To come up with the numbers, BrightEdge tapped into their giant Data Cube repository which contains information about billions of pieces of content from all over the web. Sounds like a machine that could take over the world. Luckily it’s on our side. . . for now.

The Data Cube sliced and diced to find out which was the most effective driver of traffic; organic search, paid, display /email or social. Want to guess which one came out on top? If you paid attention to the title of this post then you already know but I’ll make a dramatic reveal anyway.

 

Ode to a Search Engine: A look at Google’s 10 biggest search milestones

Google, how do I love thee? Let me count the ways. I love you for your intuition and how you know what I’m thinking when even I’m not so sure. I love you for your image search that helps me find a name for the thing I just bought at the thrift shop.  I love you for your inventive and amusing Google Doodles. (Doctor Who returns on Saturday!)

google doodle dr who
But mostly, I love the way you serve my content to millions of people on a daily basis absolutely free of charge.

Google tests ‘listen now’ ads for music searches

Have a sudden craving for some Monkees music. Google has you covered. Simply type the band’s name into the Google search box and you’ll be presented with three online options. Google Play, where you can buy individual songs for $1.29 each or streaming through Rhapsody or Beats.

Music ads

I don’t listen to a lot of music online, so I wasn’t familiar with Beats. Turns out it’s a new streaming service from the Beats by Dr. Dre headphone folks. Inexplicably, Apple bought the service this past May for $3 billion dollars. The move does give Apple control of two large streaming services; iTunes Radio and the commercial-free, trendy Beats. Apple says they’ll continue to operate the two as separate companies which makes sense because they each satisfy a different audience. iTunes Radio is good for the casual listener while Beats pulls in those who are serious about their music.

Just 27% of digital marketers give their clients the very best results [infographic]

If there’s one thing that marketers are known for, it’s our ability to exaggerate and embellish. So, it’s somewhat surprising that in a recent SEMPO survey, just 27% of digital marketing agencies claim to be “very successful” in their efforts.

As if that isn’t bad enough, their ability to measure ROI from their efforts had dropped across all channels since 2012!

Measuring Digital Marketing Infographic