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Wikipedia Links No Longer Passing PageRank

SEJ reports that Wikipedia has gone ahead and added the NOFOLLOW attribute to all external links, effectively dismissing any link-juice value from Wikipedia links.

While marketers may still benefit from the actual link traffic, this marks the end of receiving any PageRank value from the highly-respected resource.

So, in response, any future links to Wikipedia from us, will include a NOFOLLOW. Maybe if we all take that approach, Wikipedia will lose its PageRank and won’t have to worry about link-spam any longer. ;-)

Join the “NOFOLLOW me to Wikipedia” campaign!

Google Allows Competing Contextual Ads on Same Page as AdSense

JenSense has the scoop on Google’s policy change that will allow publishers to display competing contextual ad units, alongside AdSense, so long as they don’t look like Google’s ads.

“When it comes to enforcing policies on third-party contextual ads, we’ll be following the updated program policies instead of the T&Cs on this point. That is to say, publishers may now display other contextual ads on the same site or page as Google ads as long as they don’t have the same look and feel as our ads,” Brian Axe tells Jennifer Slegg of JenSense.

Jennifer does warn that you still have to ensure the other ad units don’t have a TOS that prevents you showing alongside others. e.g. Yahoo still won’t let you show their ads alongside other contextual ad units, such as AdSense.

Why Marketing Agencies Shouldn’t Publish Their Fees

Karri Flatla has given me a good topic for a future article in the business coaching series. She argues that B2B firms should publish their prices on their web site

What is worse is that business owners will rationalize their choice to not list prices until they are blue in the face, claiming they want their visitors to shop value, not price. This is apparently in hopes that the unsuspecting visitor will call them up to find out the price. It’s very egocentric when you think about it. Moreover, by not listing prices, you frustrate your users and, in effect draw more attention to the “How much does it cost?” question. I doubt that is the intended effect.

Google Officially Selects Lenoir for Data Center

Hot off the press comes news that Google has officially selected Lenoir, in North Carolina, for the site of its $600 million data center.

Gov. Mike Easley announced Google has selected the Caldwell County location and will create around 210 new jobs.

“This company will provide hundreds of good-paying, knowledge-based jobs that North Carolina’s citizens want,” Easley said in a statement. “It will help reinvigorate an area hard hit by the loss of furniture and textile jobs with 21st century opportunities.”

Yay for North Carolina!

Hat-tip to Sheila.

Linkbaiting in 2007

I don’t know who’s smarter, Nick Wilson for writing this excellent post on linkbaiting tactics for 2007, or Danny Sullivan for persuading him to publish this post (which is blatant linkbait itself) on Search Engine Land. Regardless, it’s a great read.

Linkbait, as we know it, can be summed up using just one of Nick’s paragraphs…

Good linkbait is remarkable. There are many components to good linkbait, and infinite strategies and hooks, but at the end of the day, it boils down to this one thing. Your content needs to be amazing. If you can hit that sweet spot for your audience then the links will roll in, and in, and in, and in.

And what’s the future of linkbaiting? Nick suggests the NYT may have it right, with their article on widgets.

V7N Enters the Link Buying Business

Peter da Vanzo on V7N’s SEO blog announced Wednesday that V7N is entering the link buying field. No, they’re not buying links for themselves—they’re offering a service similar to Text Link Ads. But, of course, different.

V7N boasts that their Contextual Links system is superior to any other link buying because the links they’re selling are completely “unmarked” and undetectable as paid links to Google or anyone else. The links are also better because they’re one-off payments of $20 per link. Best of all, as “contextual” links, they occur in sentences. V7N says that “For SEO purposes, contextual links are unbeatable.”

The links are permanent, and presumably one-way, links. Publishers, who earn $10 per link, are not required to make any comments or endorsements. It doesn’t appear that publishers are required to disclose the relationship at all. V7N says most of their publishers are blogs.

MIVA Launches New Ad Solutions for Publishers

Publishers and bloggers, looking to monetize their site, have a new option to consider with today’s launch of MIVA MC. Any publisher in the U.S. or U.K. can apply for a MIVA MC account, and if accepted into the program, can display a wide array of ads on their site, including:

  • Content Ads: keyword or contextually targeted Pay-Per-Click Ads displayed in fully customized implementations beside site content.
  • MIVA InLine Ads: Pay-Per-Click Ads that appear when users mouse over hyperlinked keywords within actual site content.
  • Search Ads: Pay-Per-Click Ads displayed in response to specific typed-in search queries.