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Google, Yahoo & Apple Boosting Silicon Valley Real Estate

If you’re looking to locate your business in California’s Silicon Valley and are feeling the pain of real estate prices, we know who you should blame.

Apple, Google and Yahoo are collectively buying-up large parcels of land in the Valley and driving up commercial real estate values in the process. Collectively, the three big tech companies spent more than half a billion dollars on land and buildings in 2006.

Google’s expansion in Mountain View, in particular, has reduced vacancy rates, in turn driving up costs.

Mountain View’s Shoreline park was one of them, according to Ellis Berns, Mountain View’s economic development manager. “After the dot-com bust, there was 28 to 30 percent vacancy,” he said. “We’re now running in the neighborhood of 8.5 percent.

Search Marketers Share Flickr Photos

I often get emailed by new bloggers, asking me to add their blog to my blogroll or link to a specific article. I typically avoid linking, just because I am asked, instead I tell the blogger that I’ll keep an eye on their blog and link to anything I find interesting.

Ok, with that preamble out of the way, here’s where I am going. If you want to get your blog on the radar of other bloggers, create something unique and interesting. I’ve never heard from Andrew Girdwood, but he was smart enough to put together a list of search marketers sharing their photos via Flickr. Not only is this interesting, and going in my bookmarks, but by including the names of popular bloggers, he’ll likely get a lot of links from it.

2007 Predictions

Mashable has “tagged” me to share my predictions for 2007. Here’s some brief thoughts…

  1. Digg will get acquired or die (maybe even both). I think Digg is very close to jumping the shark and is close to its maximum level of exposure. It will either realize this and sell or wait too long and decline.
  2. Yahoo’s new search interface and algo will be key in the revival of the company’s fortunes. Once they switch to a platform that includes a performance metric, they’ll see better average CPCs.
  3. Social media marketing (SMM) will find its place. There will be some marketing agencies who actually figure out how to show an ROI from SMM.
  4. We’ll see at least one company, offering search marketing services, go public in 2007 and more acquired than in 2006.

Google Coming to North Carolina? Part 2

Just over a year ago, I pieced together a whole bunch of rumor and speculation to show reasons why Google could set-up office in North Carolina.

Thirteen months on and we learn that N.C. has offered Google $4.7m in incentives if it builds a server farm in struggling Caldwell County.

A company spokesman told The News & Observer via e-mail that the company is evaluating a number of sites, including the one in Lenoir, for an expansion that could bring $600 million in new investment and 210 jobs to a region socked by job and industry losses.

That sound you hear is the many techies in North Carolina updating their resume. ;-)

UPDATE: According to Lenoir resident, Mark S, there’s a lot of grading and preparation going on at the rumored Google site.

Google Faces Catch-22 With Deleted Gmails

TechCrunch has details of a developing story involving the Gmail accounts of 60 users who found all emails deleted due to a suspected breach in FireFox.

Now here’s the catch-22 for Google. Supposedly, once an email is deleted in Gmail, it is gone forever. That keeps the privacy conspiracy theorists happy.

If you’re not able to locate a message in your Inbox, Sent Mail, All Mail, or Trash, it’s been permanently removed from your Gmail account. Unfortunately, we’re unable to recover messages or Contact entries that have been deleted from your account.

Now, what if Google is able to restore the deleted emails of the Gmail accounts effected? Wouldn’t that prove that Google keeps a secret backup of all deleted data?

Google Expands Print Ads (again)

The Washington Post says that Google is set to further expand its print ad program soon, after a rocky start in March and one expansion in November. Google’s director of print ads, Tom Phillips, is naturally quite optimistic about the future of the program. Newspaper execs are less enthused, as the Post says it remains unclear how much the program will truly benefit newspapers.

The Post states:

Todd Haskell, vice president of business development at the New York Times Co., which is participating, said that the product has the potential to drum up new business from small advertisers but that the Times does not foresee letting go of its direct relationships with its largest advertisers.

(Did anyone think that they would? Was it unclear that Google was selling off excess ad inventory?)

Friday’s Internet Marketing News Roundup

This will likely be the last news post until after Christmas. Here’s what’s caught my attention today.

  1. Avinash Kaushik discusses the merits of javascript analytics over web log files.
  2. Robert Scoble has re-discovered banner ads. He explains how Texas Instruments’ banner ads managed to catch his attention.
  3. Mashable is reporting LinkedIn has secured new funding which suggests the company has a $250 million value.
  4. Social media expert, Neil Patel, explains why some SEO web sites are being banned by Digg. Digg just doesn’t like SEO. Maybe the social bookmark site is receiving cash incentives from Did-It.
  5. Is MSN inflating the conversion data at adCenter? Search Engine Roundtable takes a look.
  6. Wengo is offering an embedded flash player for bloggers wishing to share their good looks via their web cam.