Marketing Pilgrim's "Search Marketing" Channel

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2006 Search Blogs Awards Taking Nominations

Search Engine Journal has opened up nominations for the 2006 Search Blog Awards.

I’d ask you to nominate Marketing Pilgrim, but I wouldn’t even know which category to suggest. Maybe Loren will add a “Best Search Industry News” or “Best Blog by an Ex-Brit” category. ;-)

Google’s Failing to Stop Click Arbitrage

Who would have though click arbitrage would be a topic worthy of being covered by Forbes? The magazine looks at how Google’s attempt to prevent click arbitrage is not really working and instead, many legit businesses find themselves no longer able to afford the CPCs.

Meanwhile, Jeremy “Shoemoney” Shoemaker is living like a king off his arbitrage efforts.

Two years ago, Shoemaker says he was living on unemployment checks. Since then, he says he’s made more than $2 million by arbitraging search terms related to cell phone ringtones, teeth whitening and mortgages. “I love Google,” Schoemaker says. “They changed my life.”

I knew Jeremy had made good money off of AdSense, but TWO FRICKIN MILLION DOLLARS!!! And there was I, buying him a drink in Chicago! ;-)

Google Audio Ads Opens Up Radio Testing

About twenty advertisers are taking part in a new beta test of Google Audio Ads, ClickZ writes.

The advertisers are uploading 30-second radio ads, in MP3 format, which will air on around 700 radio stations.

 

Google Audio Ads are sold on a CPM basis through the AdWords platform, and advertisers can target on factors like geographical market and time of day. Reporting functions disclose which stations ran ads and when, and real-time air checks are available, a bit of a novelty for interactive marketers who have grown used to not seeing their non-search executions.

It’s somewhat interesting that the ads will be on a CPM and not CPA (cost per action) model. I thought Google’s plans were to shake-up the advertising industry by bringing their AdWords model to other channels. Instead, a CPM model suggests that Google’s not confident they can make money on a CPA basis on anything other than search.

A Home for Portland Search Marketers

You know an industry is maturing when it becomes large enough to create regional membership groups. Earlier this year, a bunch of DFW SEM’s formed an alliance and now some search marketers in Portland have decided they need one too.

SEMpdx is out to prove that Portland can hang with Seattle. ;-)

Search Engine Journal Gets New Look

Lee Odden points to a new look for Search Engine Journal. Looking good Loren!

Great Britain’s Online Ad Growth Higher than United States

The New York Times has a lengthy article on the growth of online advertising in Great Britain, and how it’s outpacing the U.S. In fact, online advertising in Britain is growing by 40% and is expected to account for 14% of all advertising spend – more than twice the percentage in the United States.

While it may seem strange that Britain is able to go from lagging the U.S., to kicking its butt, it makes a lot of sense.

…British media are nearly all aimed nationwide in contrast to the United States newspaper and television markets, where local and regional markets are big players. These local markets in the United States have, so far, been slow to move ad money online.

Yahoo Study Shows Benefits of Combining Search with Display Ads

A new Yahoo study, in conjunction with comScore Networks, has discovered that when combined, search and display advertising deliver profoundly better results than when used independently.

Online users who were exposed to both the search and display advertising campaigns increased their share of page views relative to competitive sites by 68 percent, and time spent by 66 percent. More importantly, among those exposed to both the search and display ads, purchases of the advertiser’s products and services increased by 244 percent online and 89 percent offline compared to online users with similar behavior who were not exposed to these ads.

There’s also positive news for those seeking brand-lift.