Marketing Pilgrim's "Search Marketing" Channel

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Pinterest expands search box, adds guided search to the web

With every passing upgrade, Pinterest is becoming more like a visual search engine and less like a social media network. A few months ago, they launched “guided search” on mobile and now that same feature is coming to the web. Kinda bass-ackwords if you ask me but they didn’t. . . .

On the web, guided search looks like this. It’s a series of filters designed to help you narrow down the choices when you’re looking for something specific.

New search on Pinterest

In the sample case, it’s about the difference between bbq (the thing you cook on outside) and bbq (the yummy food you like to eat).

90% of marketing agencies boast being successful, yet 51% fail at measuring social [infographic]

What I’d really love to see added to this infographic is, of the 90% of agencies that boast success, what percentage of their clients agree with them? ;-)

Sempo_SOS_Infographic_Overview

(Source: SEMPO)

Scammers, criminals & paedophiles ask Google to scrub their search results

Right to be forgottenWhen the European court of justice ruled that Google must allow citizens the right to be forgotten, they probably thought they were helping drunk college kids, scorned lovers, and those without any fashion sense, take back their web identity.

A noble cause.

According to The Guardian newspaper, what actually happened was the apparent scum of Europe applied to have their shady misdeeds scrubbed from the public eye:

Google said last Monday that it had so far received 41,000 requests to take down sensitive material from people in Europe since the landmark ruling, including a politician with a murky past, a convicted paedophile and a man who had attempted to murder his family and wanted to remove links about his crime. Google chief executive Larry Page has said that nearly a third of the 41,000 requests received related to a fraud or scram [sic], one fifth concerned serious crime, and 12% are connected to child pornography arrests.

Why you should head to ClickZ Live San Francisco [infographic]

Here’s a handy infographic explaining why you should head to ClickZ Live San Francisco, from our Search Channel sponsor.

clickz-live-san-francisco-infographic

Old Macdonald had a farm with internet, Gee Oh Oh Gee eL Eee!

The Wall Street Journal has exclusive details of Google’s plans to take over the world thanks to a fleet of satellites. It just needs $1 BILLION dollars!

Dr-Evil

Actually the plan is not that evil. It’s not even quasi-evil.

The Goog wants to put into orbit around 180 small, low-orbit satellites that would bring internet to rural areas of the world–allowing Old Macdonald to check-in on the Facebook status of his cows.

“Google and Facebook are trying to figure out ways of reaching populations that thus far have been unreachable,” said Susan Irwin, president of Irwin Communications Inc., a satellite-communications research firm. “Wired connectivity only goes so far and wireless cellular networks reach small areas. Satellites can gain much broader access.”

Why? The money! It’s always about the money.

Bad reputation in Europe? Google now has a form for that

keep-calm-and-i-forgotFrom old arrest records to inappropriate college party photos – seems like every day a CEO or celebrity is making apologies for past, bad behavior. Most of the time it’s simply embarrassing for a week and then the world moves on. But we’ve seen cases where past misdeeds have resulted in forced resignations and customer boycotts.

And though it’s usually the big chiefs we hear about, there are plenty of little fish getting caught in the old news net. Is it fair to judge a person by their past behavior? What if they’ve since moved on to bigger and better things? What if those old news stories turned out not to be true?

Europe’s top court recently decided that to forgive is divine but to be forgotten is the law.

Planning a vacation: value trumps loyalty and search engines rule

Booking a vacation used to be a job for a qualified professional, but now everyone’s a travel agent thanks to sites like Kayak, Orbitz and Expedia. But online booking sites come in second to the good old, everyday search engine.

The Great American Vacation Study: How Travelers Seek, Shop and Save,” from parago takes an in-depth look at how Americans are planning their leisure travel and I think there’s a lot to learn here – even if you’re not specifically in the travel industry.

It starts with a big number. 90% of the people who responded said they travel for leisure at least once a year. 82% of women and 74% of men always or almost always plan the trip themselves. I don’t know if that speaks to the ease of online bookings or a rise in our need to control all things.