Marketing Pilgrim's "Search Marketing" Channel

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Search still driving ecommerce, social and affiliate on the decline

Maybe it’s my naturally pessimistic state of mind, but when I see a comparison report, I’m more interested in what stopped working than what’s still working.

A good example is this chart from the Q1 2014 US ecommerce report from The Custora Pulse.

Cutora Pulse April 2014

Comparing 2013 to 2014, we see that search marketing is still going strong. Organic and paid combined are responsible for 44% of ecommerce orders. It worked last year and it still works today. Google is responsible for almost three-quarters of that traffic which is both good news and bad news. On the good side, you know where to go if you want results. On the downside, there’s only one place to go if you want results and that’s scary.

2014 search marketing interview with Danny Sullivan

Marketing Pilgrim’s Gareth Davies asked search marketing legend Danny Sullivan the ten most pressing questions for any search marketer…

#1 Google:

Danny Sullivan

Gareth: Danny, in the last 2 years it appears to some that Google’s Algorithm may favour a larger brand over a smaller business in the search results. How effective can SEO be for driving organic traffic to a small businesses in 2014?

Danny: I think Google’s algorithm is trying to favor brands — not large brands over small brands but brands over sites that you wouldn’t care if you never found them. Brands have value, usually offer something that you can’t get elsewhere. So I think small businesses can continue to do well with SEO.

A beginner’s guide to the difference between PPC and SEO

This post is by Simone Schuurer of Bing Ads, our Search Channel sponsor.

As we mentioned in this blog post we started a blog post series to make sure anyone is able to find information on our blog about pay per click advertising ‘basics’. When I ask people running their own business if they are investing in pay per click (PPC) advertising I get told, every so often, that they don’t need to as their site is already showing up on search engine result pages. This prompted me to write this post on what organic and paid for search engine results are. Most people will agree that showing up on both organic and paid listings will bring you the best search marketing results so – if you are a bit in the dark on this topic – read on!

Why you should care about PPC advertising

This post is by Simone Schuurer of Bing Ads, our Search Channel sponsor.

For quite some years I helped large retailers advertise their products in our paid search results. As a customer of many small businesses I can’t help but think about how ideally suited paid search would be for those running a company smaller than a national chain store. I know I’m not an independent advisor – working for Bing – but knowing search and knowing personally people behind many a small business I’d simply like to tell you why I believe pay per click advertising may benefit you.

‘If only they’d start a PPC campaign I could read my book without a worry’

‘If only they’d start a PPC campaign I could read my book without a worry’

Bing makes a visual splash with new Product Ads for search

In case you haven’t noticed, visual imagery is in like Flynn. Pinterest, Instagram, expanded photo options on Twitter and Facebook – it’s a byproduct of our lightening fast, mobile world. If we can see it, we’re more likely to choose it and buy it. So Bing is bringing that idea over to the search page with their new Product Ads.

Bing Product AdThe Product Ad can combine with the traditional text ad as well as an organic text result for a pretty big 1-2-3 punch. In this example, we have fresh flowers from Contoso Floral. Your eye goes right to the beautiful bouquets on the right.

Yahoo and Yelp Partner for a Bigger Search Push

Yelp and YahooYelp is kind of like Facebook. Lots of people complain about the network but millions of people still turn to the site for information. In Q4 2013, Yelp had a monthly average of 120 million unique visitors. By the end of 2013, there were more than 53 million reviews posted to the site and more than 60% of those reviews were four stars or above. (Proof that not everyone uses the site to complain about bad service.)

Yahoo wants a piece of that, so they’re now including data from Yelp in business search results. And Yelp seems just as excited to join their alphabetical mate for this new venture:

New Report Shows Social Media Leads to Coupon Searches

Today, I am Old Mother Hubbard – my cupboard is bare. That means I must make a trip to the grocery store and since I’ve been well-trained by the two chains I visit, I’ll first visit the web to add digital coupons to my loyalty card. I do it so automatically anymore that I forget how new this concept is. A year ago, I was heading to the store with a fist full of not-so-carefully cut bits of paper. Now I click and go.

The newly released Valassis Shopper Marketing Report shows that digital couponing is a growing trend, especially with Millennials. 40% of shoppers surveyed said their coupon usage has increased over the past year. 24% said that their use of a smartphone to get deals has also increased.