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Report shows super-spenders are more reliant on organic search

internet searchHow do you typically find online information or websites you’ve recently visited?

Forrester asked 4,600 US adults this question and I would say “the answers might surprise you” but that would be cliche. Let’s just take a look at what happened and see what we can do with the results.

Organic search landed in the number one spot (no surprise) but the second, third and fourth options weren’t that far behind.

Search only got 36% of the vote. I expected it to be closer to the 50% mark. Want to guess what came in second?

Time’s up: Facebook.

25% of respondents said they got their info from Facebook! I am surprised by that.

Third place went to TV ads with 23%, fourth to TV shows with 21%.

Court confirms Google’s search results are protected free speech

Free Speech Ruling for GoogleI’m not sure how many more companies are going to challenge the search rankings bestowed upon them by the mighty Google, but a judge in San Francisco just ruled Google is protected under the First Amendment.

In a one sentence ruling Judge Ernest Goldsmith of the superior court of California declared:

“The defendant has met its burden of showing the claims asserted against it arise from constitutionally protected activity.”

The lawsuit was brought by CoastNews.com against Google, claiming that its search results were being unfairly penalized. Google responded with an “anti-slapp” motion, often used by defendants facing lawsuits that try to stifle free speech.

Writers Rejoice! Study shows Google rewards those with more to say

searchmetrics-labs-and-robotContent marketers, would you like to know the secret to getting in good with Google’s search engine spiders? Come closer and I’ll whisper it in your ear. . . .

. . .all you have to do is post high quality, relevant content.

Honestly, it’s a little more complicated than that but when you boil down all of the data from the comprehensive 2014 Ranking Factors Study from Searchmetrics, that’s pretty much what you’re left with.

But Searchmetrics did go through the trouble of writing an 83 page document. And they did produce an adorable infographic with retro robots (its as if they know me!), so we’re going to spend some time digging a little deeper.

Another SEO tool drops the word “SEO”

This guest post is by Majestic’s Marketing Director, Dixon Jones, who explains the reasons for their recent name change.

Majestic, the link intelligence database that many SEOs have come to use on a daily basis, has dropped the “SEO” from it’s brand and from its domain name, to become majestic.com. Since most people won’t have used Google’s site migration tool before, here’s what it looks like once you press the “go” button:

MajesticSEO

In actual fact – there’s a minor bug in the tool. The address change is to the https version of majestic.com (which GWT makes us register as a separate site) but that message incorrectly omits that. Fortunately, elsewhere in GWT its clear the omission is on Google’s side, not a typo from the SEO. It is most likely that the migration tool was developed before the need for Google to have separate verification codes for http and https versions of the site.

If a link drops on the web, does Google care enough to penalize you?

Bad LinksI receive several link removal requests a month from people who have left legitimate comments on my blogs. These people followed the rules and only embedded links in the little URL field that WordPress provides by default in the comment form. It is not required that you place a link there but most people do it.

The links use the “rel=’nofollow’” attribute and I manually review all the comments. Once in a blue moon a spammer gets past my vigilance with a well-crafted generic comment. I have learned to be more suspicious and to sometimes search the Web for the 1-2 sentences that the spammers leave before approving comments.

The Problem Is Not the Links: It is the Lack of Research

Just 27% of digital marketers give their clients the very best results [infographic]

If there’s one thing that marketers are known for, it’s our ability to exaggerate and embellish. So, it’s somewhat surprising that in a recent SEMPO survey, just 27% of digital marketing agencies claim to be “very successful” in their efforts.

As if that isn’t bad enough, their ability to measure ROI from their efforts had dropped across all channels since 2012!

Measuring Digital Marketing Infographic

Journalists abusing Google’s “Right to Be Forgotten” Process?

Google is struggling with the European “right to be forgotten” process.

Journalist abuseBlah, blah, blah.

It’s learning as it goes.

Blah, blah, blah.

Has approved 53% of removal requests.

Blah, blah, blahdidy blah.

Claims journalists are trying to abuse the system.

Blah, bl….wait, what?

Yep, buried among Google’s continuing gripes about trying to implement the controversial European ruling is this:

Google said it had rejected a number of requests made by journalists, who wanted links to articles at publications where they no longer worked to be taken down, according to the company’s statement.

You don’t say.

Why in the world would they want to do that? Unless, they’re just trying to get their former employer’s content kicked out of Google. You know, so that their new boss benefits from less competition.