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Google Calendar Available Offline

By Trisha Lyn Fawver

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Last week, Google announced that Google Calendar will be available to view offline. They’ve already offered users the ability to view Gmail offline at the end of January, and last week’s announcement both excites and dismays me at the same time. 

There’s been a lot of talk in the last two years about the move from desktop-based computing to cloud computing with the widespread adoption of Google Documents, Google Calendar, and other online services that have slowly replaced traditional software applications for many astute marketers and business people.  In fact, taking a look at the schedule for the Web 2.0 Expo in San Francisco later this month you’ll see several sessions regarding cloud computing.

Is Google bringing the cloud down to Earth?

Social Networking Surpasses Email Popularity

I’m sure I don’t have to tell you that social networking is popular. According to Nielsen Online, it’s become a whole lot more popular. From December 2007 to December 2008, social networks or blogs account for nearly 10% of all Internet time, and the “Member Communities” category of sites surpassed the email category in Internet popularity, measured by time on site. (Don’t worry, though: search, portals and software apps still edge out social networks.)

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Nielsen reports that two-thirds of the world’s Internet population belongs to a social network, though the by-country stats show a little more variation: only half of Switzerland’s and Germany’s residents are on social networks, while Brazil has 80% of its population social networking (Orkut FTW!). In Brazil, one in every four minutes online is spent on a social networking site. (In the UK, it’s one of every six minutes, in the US, it’s one of every sixteen.)

Friends with Everyone Without Knowing Anyone?

We are sifting through mountains and mountains of information and data these days. There is more to look at and digest and analyze and consider and handshake-friend1ponder and complain about and on and on. Not only that but we now have so many friends that who has time for anything?

What you say? You still have the same amount of friends? What are you some kind of social media slacker? What’s that? Your definition of friend isn’t defined in terms of social media? What’s wrong with you?

The New York Times wonders aloud, and I think with good reason, what we are doing to the term friend. While this ‘debate’ has been whacked around by many it is one that is not likely to go away. The rapid rate of change in capabilities of Twitter, Facebook and every other social media outlet is changing our culture. But how and to what?

Skittles Social Media Campaign Increases Traffic 1332% in One Day

Say what you want about the Skittles experiment with social media, the campaign was effective in increasing the rainbow candy’s web site presence.

Hitwise reports a 1332% increase in web visitors on March 3rd.

Alexa–put the rotten tomatoes away–confirms this jump in traffic:

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And Google Trends saw a spike in the number of people searching for “skittles.”

Google’s Double-talk Practically Guarantees It Will Acquire Twitter

During Charlie Rose’s interview with Google CEO Eric Schmidt, the topic of future acquisitions comes-up. Of course, many of us expect Google to acquire Twitter. Schmidt explains:

I shouldn’t talk about specific acquisitions. We’re unlikely to buy anything in the short term partly because I think prices are still high. And it’s unfortunate I think we’re in the middle of a cycle. Google is generating a lot of cash. And so we keep that cash in extremely secure banks.

So there you have it! Google will acquire Twitter!

I know, I know, Schmidt didn’t actually say that, but since when does Google ever clearly express its intentions? "No intention," "unlikely," and "no plans" are all standard issue for Google’s executives and time after time the search engine proves that it plays word-games with the media.

Goliath Picks on David: The Tweet-Wars Begin

by Matt Rebeiro

Just a thought: who else finds that Twitter is their new RSS feed? Yep, me too!

Further observation tells me there are only two things being discussed in the news: the global recession and Twitter. Seriously, when was the last time you read a news story that wasn’t about how we’re all poor and talking to each other in 140 character bursts?

In the case of the former (the global recession), Google has once again leapt to the rescue and are offering a Google branded solution; their ‘Tip Jar‘. Financial panacea? Hardly. Interesting bit of digital fluffery? Probably.

Anyway, when taking time out from solving the world’s financial ills one tip at a time, Google has decided to get—how to say—’snarky’ about Twitter’s increasing popularity.

Why Google & Twitter Need to Ditch “Nofollow” for All Our Sakes!

Two Thomsons Gazelles Butt HeadsWhile we’re busy discussing whether Twitter can become the next big search engine, or if Google can figure out how to tap into the “fresh” micro-content being churned out every second, we’re missing one crucial element that’s preventing both sides from achieving their goal.

The nofollow link tag.

(To clarify, I mean the rel=”nofollow” attribute, which is not the same as the “nofollow” meta tag, but many in the industry still refer to as a “tag” anyway)

What was initially sold by Google as a means to stop our “Google Juice” being shared with sites we don’t trust, is now so pervasive, it’s preventing search engines from tapping into the hundreds of newly minted web pages, video streams, images, and blog posts that are shared each day on sites such as Twitter.