Marketing Pilgrim's "Social Media" Channel

Sponsor Marketing Pilgrim's Social Media Channel today! Get in front of some of the most influential readers in the Internet and social media marketing industry. Contact us today!

Unborn Baby Gets Facebook Profile

image It’s bad enough that expecting parents are naming their kids based on Google search results, now we learn they’re giving them Facebook profiles too!

Australian couple Claire Gillis and Luke Waring have set up a Facebook profile for the child–due in 3 months–and are providing updates on the baby’s progress, says Reuters.

“We have friends and family all over the world, so we’re using it for them, to post updates on ultrasounds, scans and what it has been doing all week, so that’s how it started,” Gillis told Australia’s Daily Telegraph newspaper.

The grainy black-and-white ultrasound image of “Bubba Waring” has 29 friends listed, with dozens more waiting to be accepted by “the world’s most famous fetus,” Gillis said.

Listen-Up! Not Everyone is a Facebook Friend

200708141009Just a few days ago, I cautioned that social networking is not a popularity contest. Just because someone asks to be your “friend” doesn’t mean that you should automatically agree. Apparently we need to share that message again as a new study by IT security firm Sophos reveals 41% if Facebook users gave up full access to their personal information to a fake user.

Sophos created a fake Facebook profile, under the name ‘Freddi Staur’ (‘ID Fraudster’ with the letters rearranged), and randomly requested 200 members to be friends with ‘Freddi.’ Out of those 200, 87 accepted the friend request and 82 of those gave ‘Freddi’ access to “personal information” such as e-mail addresses, dates of birth, addresses and phone numbers, and school or work data. Presumably, the other five had restricted ‘Freddi’ to limited profile access, which many users select for bosses, parents, or people they don’t know in real life.

Facebook Glitch Reveals Source Code–Is it theirs Anyway?

Due to what appears to be a technical glitch, Facebook published its source code for the world to see and Facebook Secrets was quick to publish it.

Don’t worry if you’ve never heard of Facebook Secrets, the site was created on a free Blogspot blog and has just one post–the one showing Facebook’s source code.

This is extremely embarrassing for Facebook for a number of reasons:

  1. Questions are now being raised as to what else might accidentally get published–maybe you’ll see your private data some day.
  2. Competitors now have a chance to see what’s under Facebook’s hood and maybe learn something.
  3. Hackers might be able to find a weakness in the code and exploit it.
  4. Some developers are suggesting the structure of Facebook isn’t particularly sophisticated.

Step One: Cut off Nose. Step Two: Spite Facebook.

Late last week, Virgin Media, Prudential, Vodafone, Halifax, First Direct Bank and the Automobile Association Ltd. pulled advertising from Facebook for fear of their ads being seen on the same page as the British National Party Facebook group.

With an astronomical number of page views and time spent on site, advertising on Facebook creates the opportunity for a massive number of click throughs. At the very least, it’s a great branding opportunity—if your ad is shown on the right pages.

Controlling your online image is an important part of branding, as is carefully selecting the sites where you advertise. You wouldn’t want your brand associated with a porn site (okay, depending on the brand, I guess). So, when debating whether or not to advertise on Facebook, let me give you one piece of information that may make all the difference to you:

Are Social Network Users Libertarian Voters?

image It seems republican presidential hopeful Ron Paul can’t keep out of the news. Unfortunately, he’s not exactly getting coverage for his dominance in the polls, but for his dominance in social media.

Our own presidential candidates search reputation study shows Paul as having one of the best Google reputations, but CNET’s fascinated by his overall social networking presence.

Paul, 71, enjoys about 160,000 mentions on Digg.com, more than the next four most popular candidates combined. Alexa.com’s statistics show Paul’s Web site with a narrow lead over all the Democratic candidates and a sizable one over his fellow Republicans. Similarly, a report by Hitwise puts Paul’s Web site ahead of other GOP candidates in terms of popularity.

Plaxo Pulse Aggregating Your Social Networking Profiles

It seems that just about every company wants a piece of the social networking industry – and the valuations that go with it – and Plaxo is the latest to join the party.

While Plaxo is already somewhat a social network – after all you can aggregate all of your contacts and share information between them – but with the launch of Pulse, you can now share all of your social profiles.

Plaxo claims Pulse uses “people feeds” to bring together your activities across more than a dozen social networks. Here’s the list of supported sites at launch:

Plaxo says the list of supported sites will continue to grow and you can categorize your contacts so you get to decide who sees those wild photos from that party on Saturday.

Online Harassment becoming a major concern in Australia

Many people are concerned that the Internet and Social Media are difficult to control, and an Australian woman, who was a victim of identity theft and harassment online, has spoken out this week.

When men started calling, emailing, texting, and even turning up at her door, Cathy (not her real name) became aware that a bogus MySpace profile had been set up in her name. The site detailed her personal information, alongside suggestive photographs and explicit text, asking anyone interested to contact her.

It’s not clear how often this kind of thing happens (she thought is was her ex boyfriend), but with 3.8 million profiles in Australia alone, it’s likely that there are many more cases like this, though MySpace insists that it does not tolerate this kind of behaviour.