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Step One: Cut off Nose. Step Two: Spite Facebook.

Late last week, Virgin Media, Prudential, Vodafone, Halifax, First Direct Bank and the Automobile Association Ltd. pulled advertising from Facebook for fear of their ads being seen on the same page as the British National Party Facebook group.

With an astronomical number of page views and time spent on site, advertising on Facebook creates the opportunity for a massive number of click throughs. At the very least, it’s a great branding opportunity—if your ad is shown on the right pages.

Controlling your online image is an important part of branding, as is carefully selecting the sites where you advertise. You wouldn’t want your brand associated with a porn site (okay, depending on the brand, I guess). So, when debating whether or not to advertise on Facebook, let me give you one piece of information that may make all the difference to you:

Are Social Network Users Libertarian Voters?

image It seems republican presidential hopeful Ron Paul can’t keep out of the news. Unfortunately, he’s not exactly getting coverage for his dominance in the polls, but for his dominance in social media.

Our own presidential candidates search reputation study shows Paul as having one of the best Google reputations, but CNET’s fascinated by his overall social networking presence.

Paul, 71, enjoys about 160,000 mentions on Digg.com, more than the next four most popular candidates combined. Alexa.com’s statistics show Paul’s Web site with a narrow lead over all the Democratic candidates and a sizable one over his fellow Republicans. Similarly, a report by Hitwise puts Paul’s Web site ahead of other GOP candidates in terms of popularity.

Plaxo Pulse Aggregating Your Social Networking Profiles

It seems that just about every company wants a piece of the social networking industry – and the valuations that go with it – and Plaxo is the latest to join the party.

While Plaxo is already somewhat a social network – after all you can aggregate all of your contacts and share information between them – but with the launch of Pulse, you can now share all of your social profiles.

Plaxo claims Pulse uses “people feeds” to bring together your activities across more than a dozen social networks. Here’s the list of supported sites at launch:

Plaxo says the list of supported sites will continue to grow and you can categorize your contacts so you get to decide who sees those wild photos from that party on Saturday.

Online Harassment becoming a major concern in Australia

Many people are concerned that the Internet and Social Media are difficult to control, and an Australian woman, who was a victim of identity theft and harassment online, has spoken out this week.

When men started calling, emailing, texting, and even turning up at her door, Cathy (not her real name) became aware that a bogus MySpace profile had been set up in her name. The site detailed her personal information, alongside suggestive photographs and explicit text, asking anyone interested to contact her.

It’s not clear how often this kind of thing happens (she thought is was her ex boyfriend), but with 3.8 million profiles in Australia alone, it’s likely that there are many more cases like this, though MySpace insists that it does not tolerate this kind of behaviour.

Cisco Acquires Social Networks Company, Why?

VentureBeat seems to understand why Cisco just acquired Five Across, a San Francisco company that helps companies build their own social networks. Unfortunately, I’m having a had time believing this is a good decision.

The move is understandable, though. Based on conversations with three or four different Cisco executives in recent months, it is clear Cisco sees social networking and the wider Web 2.0 phenomenon as ways to drive Internet traffic, and thus traffic over their routers and other networking gear – and, it follows, more revenue for Cisco.

Social Networking is Not Always a Popularity Contest

Now that I have just about every popular social network profile under the sun, I wanted to share an observation: Having a social network is not just a popularity contest.

Sure, the younger you are, the more you may want to be liked and show-off your popularity – that’s part of the reason why MySpace has become so popular. Once you get out into the real world (boy do I sound like my parents), you’ll realize that life is not always about “he who has the most friends wins.”

Take a look at where popularity works and where it doesn’t.

Twitter – there’s no harm in letting countless numbers follow your Tweets, but do you really need to follow the micro-updates of people you don’t know?

How to Spam Leverage a Network

Okay, I know that spammers aren’t really going to read this, but legitimate webmasters can promote their blogs on social networks like MyBlogLog, too. But you gotta do it the right way if you don’t want to be labeled a “SchMOe.”

So, when using any social network to try to appeal to someone to visit, read or link to your content, here’s some good ideas:

  • Figure out if you’re in anyway relevant to their site—and especially if you’re a “competitor.” If you occupy the exact same space, your target might still be interested. However, if you occupy a completely different space, really, deeply contemplate whether that SEO blog will link to your carburettor blog.