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SEO: The Best Way to Get People to Your Website Video

I know we all miss Andy. I’m sure he misses us, too, if he ever thinks about the blogosphere while vacationing in Tahiti (but why would you?).

I know I’m a poor substitute for Mr. Beal himself, so here’s something to make us all feel better: a video interview with Andy. Podtech Networks’ Jennifer Jones interviewed Andy on SEO. Enjoy (and don’t worry; Andy will be back next week)!

Hearst to Deal 12 Blows to YouTube?

William Randolph Hearst entered the publishing business in 1887. Since then, and even after his death, his empire has continued to grow. 120 years later, the media conglomerate that started with the San Francisco Examiner owns dozens of newspapers, magazines and television channels—and would like to ‘pwn’ YouTube.

Hearst has already begun its online video channels with TeenMag.com‘s branded video player. Hearst plans 12 more channels to be debut over the next three months, including branded players for magazine sites like Good Housekeeping, Esquire and Cosmopolitan.

Hearst relies on MSN for online video syndication now, but VP & General Manager of Hearst Magazines Digital Media Chuck Corddry says, “We may or may not avail ourselves of the syndication portion of the product.”

The rest of the story

Here’s some of the news also going on in the search world now:

  • Google Blogoscoped features an FAQ of Google censorship, including a pretty comprehensive history of censorship by Google—and not just on Google.cn. Says Phillip Lenssen: “For the scope of this FAQ I’ll define censorship as missing results which are filtered for reasons of politics or regulations, not because they’re spam, non-family friendly, or copyright-infringements (though your mileage may vary).”
  • Today is Yahoo’s 12th birthday, according to Wired. That explains why they’re having such a hard time lately—they’re in the ‘awkward’ stage.
  • eMarketer reports that Facebook is tops with the 17-25 demographic (free on a limited basis). As a member of that demographic, I say, “Duh. MySpace is for my 15-year-old sister and child predators.” Females in the demographic name MySpace and YouTube as numbers 2 and 3, respectively. Males pick YouTube and Yahoo! as 2 and 3 (MySpace is #6—ight above Wikipedia).

YouTube’s Latest Wins and Losses

Loss: After Viacom got YouTube to remove its videos and signed a deal with Joost.com, Viacom announced yesterday that its video views and profits were up:

“Video streaming traffic on our sites has increased dramatically, an important validation of our strategy,” said Philippe Dauman, president and chief executive of Viacom, owned by media mogul Sumner Redstone.

Traffic to Comedy Central’s website was up more than 90 per cent, MTV.com had increased by more than 50 per cent and Nickelodeon had seen more than 30 per cent more traffic in the past month, Viacom said.

The media group, which released fourth-quarter results on Thursday, said quarterly profit nearly quadrupled to $480m, partly reflecting the acquisition of the DreamWorks film studio.

(From the Financial Times.)

CNNMoney Scolds Media for Shunning YouTube

Today, CBS spurned YouTube for its online user-generated video content, going with CSTV instead (check it out on MarketingVox). The college sports network will be teaming up with CBS for a March-Madness-themed UGC contest (though I can’t imagine anyone would want to watch the NCAAs when you just know Duke won’t win. So sad. ;) ).

Roger Kay, principal analyst at Endpoint Technologies Associates, says of the CBS/CSTV deal: “It’s about narrowcasting—getting a more finely grained view of your audience and being able to cater to them more specifically is now more attractive.”

Apparently CBS officials don’t read CNNMoney.com. Yesterday’s commentary, entitled “Wake up, media! YouTube is not the enemy!“, counseled big media corporations that they shouldn’t fear YouTube, but embrace it. From the article:

Australia’s Schools Blocking YouTube

It’s seems appropriate (seeing that I am in Australia) that I mention news that the Australian state of Victoria has banned YouTube in its schools.

Victoria, Australia’s second most populous state, has banned the popular video-sharing site from its 1,600 government schools after a gang of male school students videotaped their degrading assault on a 17-year-old girl on the outskirts of the state capital of Melbourne.

It seems to me, they should have banned YouTube in schools anyway – it’s hardly a resource school kids need to access, is it?

“Kids, today, we’re going to learn about the evolution of dance. You will be tested!”

Take Advantage of Google’s “YouTube Bias”

A pingback from BlackHatSEO.no on yesterday’s post about YouTube infiltrating Google SERPs brought up an interesting point that I hadn’t considered.

What, you can’t read Norwegian? Okay, neither can I. But I’ll attempt to paraphrase:

Jordan McCollum from Marketing Pilgrim has an interesting post on how YouTube is beginning to creep up the SERPs. There’s some potential here—if your site is stuck in “Google’s Sandbox” you can generate a strategic video, optimize YouTube for on-site search [I think] and drive video traffic from YouTube to your site.

Now there’s one way to use YouTube to really help with your online marketing: but easier said than done. The “shoes” video apparently ranks because it’s a viral hit, and is probably most popular for its shock value and oddball humor. Can you imagine how it would change your perception of the brand if the video featured the words “ManoloBlahnik.com”? (That’s an upscale women’s shoe brand, whose shoes may well cost $300 or more. Let’s get ‘em.)