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Google Hands Over YouTube User Info to Court

If you think you’re safe behind your YouTube username, think again.

ASPnews.com is reporting Google’s YouTube has complied with subpoenas issued by the U.S. District Court in Northern California, and turned over the identities of two users who illegally uploaded entire episodes of “24″ prior to its broadcast and DVD release.

“We intend to use the information provided to pursue all available legal remedies against those who infringed our copyrights,” 20th Century Fox Television Vice President of Media Relations Chris Alexander.

Google’s compliance has ramifications beyond just the uploading of videos. If a court asks for any information on a user, you can bet Google’s going to fold and hand it over.

Via Threadwatch.

The Video Search, Copyright Conundrum

Media Post suggests that smaller companies are providing better solutions for searching video content on the web.

However, no one has cracked the code yet on how to sift through these videos. Once they do, the ripple effect in advertising should be massive, as marketers will be able to couple their ads with the videos returned, just as they do in text search.

While you may see a ripple effect, with better ad targeting, what about the tidal wave coming in the other direction? If video search technology does indeed get to the level of sophistication, that it can identify your favorite video clip, content owners are going to demand it be used to identify and filter copyrighted content.

Google’s Evil Master Plan Revealed in Video?

Googlezon has long been the benchmark video for spreading fear about the power of Google. Now comes a new entrant, “Master Plan – about the power of Google“.

It’s a sobering video, suggesting that Google is collecting far too much information about you and perhaps sharing it with the CIA.

Hat-tip Brian

If MySpace Can Block Copyrighted Videos, Why Can’t YouTube?

MySpace has announced a partnership with Audible Magic to identify and screen uploaded videos for copyrighted content.

Audible Magic uses audio fingerprinting technology to identify the audio digital signature in any video file and then looks for matches against a database of copyrighted content.

MySpace said it maintains a database of fingerprints uploaded by content owners. The blocking of unauthorized clips is on a voluntary basis to prevent the exclusion of materials that companies want to be uploaded, such as those by a company’s marketing department.

The process of identifying the audio channel from a video clip is a lot easier than trying to match the video content.

YouTube’s Integration With Google Search Leading to "NSFW" Content?

Yikes!

That was my response when Barbara Coll shared with me the type of search results we can expect to see, with the integration of YouTube content with Google’s search results.

The “Webmama” searched for the rather innocent “shoes” on Google and discovered content that you wouldn’t expect, and certainly wouldn’t want your kids to see.

The description reads like – well – someone who uses a lot of swear words to get their point across. I hope Google is going to start filtering this kind of content…I don’t think they want the word fuc#!!k to show up in their results for consumer-based words like shoes.

Why in the world would they want to integrate YouTube with regular search results anyway?

Michael Jackson to Help IAC Enter Online Video Space

How about that attention-grabbing headline? See, I read the articles on the importance of headlines too, you know. ;-)

Anyway, it’s all true. Michael Jackson, the former president of cable channel USA Networks (oh wait, you thought it was the “ch’mon”, “hee, hee, hee” Jackson?) is just one of the signs that suggests Barry Diller and his formidable IAC network of companies (including Ask, Ticketmaster & CitySearch), is getting ready to branch out into online video content.

According to CNET

Some observers expect Diller to soon branch off in yet another direction: online video. A former chairman of Paramount Pictures and once one of Hollywood’s most influential executives, Diller has signaled his readiness to get back to his roots.

66% of Internet users viewed online video; Wal-Mart joins the fray

Advertising.com has released a study that indicates that 66% of Internet users age 18 and up surveyed viewed online video content at least once a week. Advertising.com divided their results into two age demographics: 18 to 34 and 35 and up.

Key findings for each demographic included:

  • 18 to 34

    • 44% of online video viewers fell into this age group.
    • Most popular video-related activities: watching TV episodes online, creating videos and forwarding clips to friends.
    • Prefers streaming entertainment (music videos, TV shows, movie trailers).
  • 35 and up
    • A whopping 56% of online video viewers were age 35 or over.
    • More likely to stream news and sports clips.