R.I.P. Technorati top bloggers index

TechnoratiBack in the old days of blogging, I used to have to publish a post uphill–both ways–and there was a web site called Technorati that was the be all and end all of blogging.

Back in the mid-2000s Marketing Pilgrim was full of news and announcements from Technorati. If we weren’t breaking down their State of the Blogosphere, we were trying to crack the popular Top 100 list.

Unfortunately, since David Sifry left Technorati, there’s not been much to report on. Until today.

It is with fond memories, that I share news that Technorati’s top bloggers list is no more. A moment of silence, please.

<insert silence here>

According to B2C:

On May 29th, 2014, Technorati removed millions of pages from the web, deleting their entire blog directory and all associated information.

Majority of consumers say they aren’t influenced by branded social media

WSJ Report Social MediaConsidering what I do for a living it worries me to see a report like the one Gallup published today. 62% of consumers say that social media has no influence whatsoever over their purchasing decisions.

Even 34% of consumers who like / follow a brand on social media said what they saw there didn’t influence their decision to buy.

Really? Or could it be that customers don’t know their own minds? I may not recall seeing an ad for a certain brand of peanut butter but still I choose that one over the competing brand when I go to the store. Coincidence?

Brand recognition is a huge part of social media. Those posts and videos and Pinterest pins may not lead to a direct click but over time they make an impression.

Channel Sponsors

Facebook improves video ranking when you upload directly to the site

Facebook VideoFacebook says twice as many people are watching videos in their news feed compared to just six months ago. That’s quite an improvement and more video watchers means more people staying longer on the page – also a good thing. But Facebook is tired of being the middleman, handling videos the live on that other well-known social media site that is all video all the time. Facebook wants you to upload your videos directly to your Facebook pages and profiles and if you do that, you’ll get a reward – more news feed impressions.

As you know, the miniature librarians that run the Facebook stream, preview every piece of content and rate it on its value to each, individual member. They look at likes, comments and shares on other posts, compare that content to the current content then send the post in question on its way either down the “Share” chute or the “Nope” chute. Picture Willy Wonka’s factory but with posts instead of candy.

Friday Round-up: Snappy TV, Pinterest Photo Tuts and Facebook ‘Ads’ Value

Let’s close out the week with a look a few smaller stories that caught my eye this week.

Twitter Gets Snappy

SnappyTV

Twitter bought SnappyTV to strengthen their position as the social media channel for network TV advertising. SnappyTV is a suite of tools that helps you create instant, shareable highlights from live TV. It can be used to create clips, GIFs (ugh) or image stills so you can share the best moments just minutes after they happen. They emphasis live TV like sports and award shows but the example shows how the CW uses it to grab hold of those Vampire Diaries fans.

It’s a perfect fit for Twitter. We’ve seen campaigns like these during major events like the Super Bowl and the Olympics, now, with SnappyTV, we should see even more!

Study shows younger males are comfortable sharing their feelings

New MalesThe past three generations of men have led very different lives. Our grandfathers grew up believing that the man should provide for his family and his feelings should be kept to himself. Our fathers lived in an era where Mr. Mom was a novelty but not an anomaly and it was okay to cry if the situation warranted it.

So where does that leave the current generations of millennials? According to a new study by Ketchum, somewhere in between the first two.

Ketchum found that young millennials in particular, those 18 to 25, are an interesting blend of modern and old school. They dub this group the New Traditionalists and they’re a hard demographic to reach.

See it. Click it. Buy it. Amazon Fire phone just shortened the purchase funnel

Amazon FireflyAmazon is now in the smartphone biz. Not a huge leap seeing as how Amazon’s original Kindle made ereaders cool and their new generation of tablets is slowly eating up the iPad’s territory. So, an Amazon branded smartphone isn’t as far out as it seems. But a smartphone isn’t a tablet and folks are used to having a wide selection of apps that they’re not going to find on the new Amazon Fire Phone.

What they will find is a nifty new Firefly Button that lets you search for items you’re interested in buying with a single touch.

Here’s the skinny from Amazon:

Size matters: 48 percent of tablet viewing time is spent watching long-form video

Browse Google and you’ll find article after article blaming MTV for the decrease in the American attention span. Instead of watching a single, 60 minute TV show, you’d see 15 to 20 pieces of content, each under 3 minutes. Don’t like what you see on screen? Hang on a minute and something new will take its place.

YouTube is like that, only you don’t have to wait for the video to end, just click, click, click and you can experience 10 programs in just a few minutes. But according to a the Q1 2014 Global Video Index from Ooyala, the attention span of your average video viewer is getting longer and longer.

ooyala Long-form video